SAN DIEGO (AP) — A federal judge says he is having second thoughts about his belief that the Trump administration was acting in good faith to comply with his orders to reunify families separated at the border.

The Justice Department on Friday filed a plan to reunify more than 2,500 children age 5 and older by a court-imposed deadline of July 26 using "truncated" procedures to verify parentage and perform background checks.

The procedures exclude DNA testing and other steps the administration took to reunify children under 5.

The administration said the abbreviated vetting puts children at significant safety risk but is needed to meet the deadline.

U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw took umbrage, disputing the administration's interpretation of his orders and saying that safe reunification can and must occur by July 26.