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BC-Deep South News Digest SUNDAY

January 13, 2019

Good afternoon! Here’s a look at how AP’s news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to:

The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org

The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau at 334-262-5947 or apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau at 504-523-3931 or nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau at 601-948-5897 or jkme@ap.org

For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Deep South Editor Jim Van Anglen can be reached at 1-800-821-3737 or jvananglen@ap.org. Administrative Correspondent Rebecca Santana can be reached at 504-523-3931 or rsantana@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

GEORGIA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

STATE LEGISLATURE-2019

ATLANTA _ Georgia lawmakers return to the state Capitol on Jan. 14 with a full slate of priorities as they consider replacing the state’s aging touchscreen voting machines and mull changing the management structure of Atlanta’s airport. But one major question remains: what legislation will be on incoming Republican Gov.-elect Brian Kemp’s agenda? A look at some of the issues and trends to watch in Georgia’s 2019 legislative session. By Ben Nadler. SENT: 800 words. AP Photo NYJK702.

RECREATIONAL FISH RULES

The rules that govern recreational marine fishing in the U.S. will get an overhaul due to a new law passed by Congress, and the country’s millions of anglers and the groups that stake their livelihoods on them hope the changes will bring better management. The new standards are part of a suite of changes that proponents call the Modern Fish Act that were approved by the House and Senate in December. Supporters of the new rules have said they will boost an industry that contributes billions to the economy, though some members of the fishing industry felt deeper rule changes were warranted. By Patrick Whittle. SENT: 570 words. AP Photo BX601.

LAKE LANIER-RAINS

GAINESVILLE, Ga. _ One of Georgia’s wettest years on record has made for a challenging time for marinas and other businesses on Lake Lanier. Gainesville, on the lake’s east side, received nearly 70 inches of rain in 2018. It was the wettest year for the city since 2013. Brent Pearson, who works for the company that owns Port Royale Marina on Lake Lanier, says it’s easier deal with low lake levels than it is high lake levels _ and that flooding can be a major problem. SENT: 330 words.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-INKED PIG BBQ RESTAURANT

GAINESVILLE, Ga. _ Good friends and seasoned chefs, Andrew Elliott and Jimmy Ellis, decided to follow their dreams and put their years of culinary experience to the test by opening The Inked Pig. The two plan to officially open their restaurant, which is located at the old Foothills Barbecue on 893 Main St. SW in Gainesville, on Saturday, Feb. 2. By Kelsey Richardson. The Gainesville Times.

SPORTS:

BKN--BUCKS-HAWKS

ATLANTA _ Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer faces his former team for the first time in Atlanta as Milwaukee seeks to avoid consecutive losses for the first time this season. The rebuilding Hawks are coming off an upset win at Philadelphia. By George Henry. UPCOMING. 650 words with photos. Game starts at 3:30 p.m.

GLF-MAJOR SHOTS

HONOLULU — Brooks Koepka still smiles at the memory of the 9-irons he hit in the final round of his second straight U.S. Open victory. Yes, that’s plural. They were on consecutive holes on the back nine at Shinnecock Hills. The one that led to birdie was memorable. The one that led to par was “by far the best shot.” It’s like that at every major championship. There are signature shots that everyone remembers, the one that gets shown during brief recaps. And there is always one shot that is memorable to the player that might not get its due because it doesn’t seem all that significant at the time. By Doug Ferguson. SENT: 980 words. AP Photos NYJK710-713.

BKW--T25-GEORGIA TECH-LOUISVILLE

LOUISVILLE, Ky. _ Second-ranked Louisville will try to bounce back from losing at No. 1 Notre Dame when it hosts Georgia Tech in ACC play. The Yellow Jackets come in off a win against Duke. By freelancer Steve Bittenbender. UPCOMING: 550 words and photos. Game starts at 2 p.m. ET.

BKW--25-TENNESSEE-GEORGIA

ATHENS, Ga. _ No. 13 Tennessee, coming off consecutive home losses, will try to rebound when it visits Georgia on Sunday. The Lady Bulldogs are 9-0 at home. UPCOMING: 150 words. Game starts at 3 p.m.

SOUTH CAROLINA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

RECREATIONAL FISH RULES

The rules that govern recreational marine fishing in the U.S. will get an overhaul due to a new law passed by Congress, and the country’s millions of anglers and the groups that stake their livelihoods on them hope the changes will bring better management. The new standards are part of a suite of changes that proponents call the Modern Fish Act that were approved by the House and Senate in December. Supporters of the new rules have said they will boost an industry that contributes billions to the economy, though some members of the fishing industry felt deeper rule changes were warranted. By Patrick Whittle. SENT: 570 words. AP Photo BX601.

RAIN POETRY

COLUMBIA, S.C. _ South Carolina’s capital city is jazzing up its sidewalks with poetry when it rains. Columbia’s public art organization One Columbia has teamed up with city poet laureate Ed Madden to create “Rain Poetry.” Madden solicited poems over the last year, and they were stenciled onto sidewalks around the city. The material used to paint the writings only shows up when wet. So when it rains, poetry appears on the sidewalks. SENT: 230 words.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-SQUIRREL-POWER OUTAGES

PELION, S.C. _ The squirrel’s beady eyes beheld a long black power line, a man-made marvel that piqued her curiosity for the last time. Like dozens of creatures before her, Lexington County’s most infamous squirrel did some damage on her way out. Officials later reckoned that in the process of getting electrocuted, the squirrel threw sparks onto the dry ground that set off a 40-acre forest fire near the rural town of Pelion in November 2017. By Paul Bowers. The Post and Courier of Charleston.

EXCHANGE-CHRISTIAN COFFEE SHOP

BALDWYN, Miss. _ After the busy lunch rush, Tammy Lee, owner of the Baldwyn-based coffee shop Fill My Cup, took some time to chat with the few locals who stopped in for a cup of coffee on a cold day, introducing her staff and making sure everyone was comfortable. Lee completed seminary school, opened an early education center for 120 children at a South Carolina church and later worked as a foster care case worker for the Department of Human Services. Lee became a foster parent herself, adopting a young girl who is now grown. By Cristina Carreon. The Daily Journal.

IN BRIEF:

_ HIGHWAY RELOCATION _ Officials are holding a meeting Tuesday to discuss relocating the historic main highway into Myrtle Beach. SENT: 130 words.

_ AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM _ A new black history museum planned in South Carolina is leasing more space to accommodate its expanding staff. SENT: 130 words.

SPORTS:

BKC--MISSOURI-SOUTH CAROLINA

COLUMBIA, S.C. _ Surprising South Carolina tries to go to 3-0 in the SEC on Saturday against Missouri, who opened league play with a loss. By Jeffrey Collins. UPCOMING: 550 words from 1 p.m. start.

Also: BKW--T25-SOUTH CAROLINA-LSU. UPCOMING: 150 words. Game starts at 5 p.m.

ALABAMA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

OFFICERS SHOT-ALABAMA

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. _ One Birmingham police sergeant was killed and another officer critically wounded early Sunday morning in a shooting as they questioned two people suspected of trying to break into cars in Alabama’s largest city. Two suspects are in custody, one of whom was shot and is receiving medical treatment, officials said. Police identified the officer who was fatally shot as Sgt. Wytasha Carter, 44, who had been with the department since 2011. They haven’t released the names of the wounded officer or the suspects. SENT: 430 words. AP Photo planned.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING-ALABAMA

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. _ Law enforcers in west Alabama are working to stop human trafficking by forming a new task force. Tuscaloosa police Capt. Darren Beams is heading up the task force of about two dozen officers from agencies across Tuscaloosa County. The West Alabama Human Trafficking Task Force was created among police departments from Tuscaloosa, Northport and the University of Alabama and the Tuscaloosa County Sheriff’s Office. Information from The Tuscaloosa News. SENT: 320 words.

RECREATIONAL FISH RULES

The rules that govern recreational marine fishing in the U.S. will get an overhaul due to a new law passed by Congress, and the country’s millions of anglers and the groups that stake their livelihoods on them hope the changes will bring better management. The new standards are part of a suite of changes that proponents call the Modern Fish Act that were approved by the House and Senate in December. Supporters of the new rules have said they will boost an industry that contributes billions to the economy, though some members of the fishing industry felt deeper rule changes were warranted. By Patrick Whittle. SENT: 570 words. AP Photo BX601.

INSIDER Q&A-TOYOTA MANUFACTURING CHIEF

DETROIT _ Chris Reynolds was promoted by Toyota late last year to one of the toughest jobs in the U.S. auto industry. He’s in charge of North American manufacturing, as well as human resources, legal, finance and communications. It’s manufacturing that will present the biggest challenge for Reynolds, who must navigate uncertain U.S. trade policies including tariff threats and possible replacement of the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico. Toyota produces vehicles in both countries for sale in the U.S. Reynolds spoke with The Associated Press after his duties were expanded by the company. SENT: 810 words. AP Photo NYBZ711.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-BRIDAL SHOP-50 YEARS

HARTSELLE, Ala. _ A Hartselle bridal shop that has sent gowns to South Africa, Scotland, Ireland, France and Australia is in the midst of an expansion that will double its floor space. The Something Blue Shoppe _ a landmark on Main Street and one of the oldest bridal shops in the state _ turns 50 this year. By Deangelo McDaniel. The Decatur Daily.

EXCHANGE-DIAL-A-RIDE

MUSCLE SHOALS, Ala. _ Mayor David Bradford said the Northwest Alabama Council of Local Government’s “dial-a-ride” program is the best kept secret in the region. “For a lot of people on a fixed income, or ones who have a handicap or can’t afford their own transportation, “dial-a-ride” is affordable and available,” Bradford said. By Tom Smith. TimesDaily.

LOUISIANA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

LOUISIANA SPOTLIGHT-ANALYSIS

BATON ROUGE, La. _ Louisiana residents hoping to see the governor and lawmakers tackle the state’s entrenched problems and enact sweeping change might need to lower their expectations. The two-month regular legislative session that starts in April comes after 10 mostly contentious legislative sessions — including seven special sessions to deal with state finances — were packed into three years. It also comes in an election year. Many lawmakers are likely to be less ambitious after the exhausting budget and tax battles they’ve waged since 2016. In addition, lawmakers and Gov. John Bel Edwards likely will be less interested in irking voters in a year where they’re running to hold onto their current seats or to advance to new elected positions. An AP News Analysis. By Melinda Deslatte. SENT IN ADVANCE: 700 words.

RECREATIONAL FISH RULES

The rules that govern recreational marine fishing in the U.S. will get an overhaul due to a new law passed by Congress, and the country’s millions of anglers and the groups that stake their livelihoods on them hope the changes will bring better management. The new standards are part of a suite of changes that proponents call the Modern Fish Act that were approved by the House and Senate in December. Supporters of the new rules have said they will boost an industry that contributes billions to the economy, though some members of the fishing industry felt deeper rule changes were warranted. By Patrick Whittle. SENT: 570 words. AP Photo BX601.

RED WOLVES

DALLAS _ Researchers say a pack of wild canines found frolicking near the beaches of the Texas Gulf Coast carry a substantial amount of red wolf genes, a surprising discovery because the animal was declared extinct in the wild nearly 40 years ago. The finding has led wildlife biologists and others to develop a new understanding that the red wolf DNA is remarkably resilient after decades of human hunting, loss of habitat and other factors had led the animal to near decimation. By David Warren. SENT: 800 words. AP Photos TXBS201-202.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-DUMP TO WETLAND PARK

WEST MONROE, La. _ The place used to be a pit, then it was a dump. Now, it’s a wetland. Restoration Park in West Monroe opened in November 2003, and parts of it need, well, restoration. Winter is turning out to be a season of renewal. By Bonnie Bolden. The News-Star.

EXCHANGE-SOUSAFUND

NEW ORLEANS _ Like most New Orleanians, Darnell Lewis has enjoyed brass melodies since he was little. His mother calls him “a real band head” who is eager to become a band director someday. But instruments are expensive tools, and Lewis’ family can’t afford to buy him a tuba. Fortunately, a new program in the city successfully awarded Lewis his very own tuba Jan. 4. By Wilborn P. Nobles III. NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune.

IN BRIEF:

_ POLITICAL HALL OF FAME _ Louisiana’s latest Political Hall of Fame inductees will include the state’s only “first gentleman,” the brother of former Gov. Edwin Edwards and an ex-lawmaker. SENT: 130 words.

_ COUNTING THE HOMELESS _ The Terrebonne-Lafourche area is preparing for a homeless count that could help get more government money for advocacy programs. SENT: 130 words.

_ CHILD KILLED _ New Orleans police says a 9-year-old girl was shot and killed in the eastern part of the city. SENT: 100 words.

SPORTS:

FBN--EAGLES-SAINTS

NEW ORLEANS _ The New Orleans Saints had the NFL’s best record, which earned them a wild-card bye while Philadelphia went to Chicago and upset the Bears. On Sunday, the defending Super Bowl champion Eagles try to make it two surprises in a row. By Pro Football Writer Barry Wilner. Kickoff scheduled for 3:20 p.m.

Also: BKW--T25-SOUTH CAROLINA-LSU. UPCOMING: 150 words. Game starts at 4 p.m.

MISSISSIPPI (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

UNDER THE CAPITOL DOME-ANALYSIS

JACKSON, Miss. _ The leader of Mississippi’s state police agencies wants to remove his agency from the state civil service system forever. Public Safety Commissioner Marshall Fisher says he’s been forced to reinstate a number of officers after what he considers “terrible” decisions by the state Employee Appeals Board that overturned agency disciplinary decisions. But Tommy Simpson of the Southern States Police Benevolent Association says what’s terrible is depriving officers of due process. By Jeff Amy. SENT IN ADVANCE: 600 words.

EMPTY PRISON

WALNUT GROVE, Miss. _ Officials in a central Mississippi town want the state prison system to reopen a closed private prison there instead of spending money to rebuild part of the Mississippi State Penitentiary at Parchman. The state closed the Walnut Grove Correctional Facility in 2016, but the Clarion Ledger reports the state is still paying $97.4 million in debt associated with the prison’s construction. Mississippi Department of Corrections Commissioner Pelicia Hall asked lawmakers in September for $22 million to rebuild Unit 29, one of the prison units at Parchman. But Leake County officials suggest the state should instead close Unit 29 and shift some inmates to a reopened Walnut Grove. SENT: 500 words.

RECREATIONAL FISH RULES

The rules that govern recreational marine fishing in the U.S. will get an overhaul due to a new law passed by Congress, and the country’s millions of anglers and the groups that stake their livelihoods on them hope the changes will bring better management. The new standards are part of a suite of changes that proponents call the Modern Fish Act that were approved by the House and Senate in December. Supporters of the new rules have said they will boost an industry that contributes billions to the economy, though some members of the fishing industry felt deeper rule changes were warranted. By Patrick Whittle. SENT: 570 words. AP Photo BX601.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-WOODEN BOW TIES

OXFORD, Miss. _ When walking around Oxford, spotting a bow tie is not an uncommon occurrence. In fact, they are extremely common in The Grove on Saturdays in the fall, there is a new style of bowtie that has taken the town by storm. Teddy Mullin has spent the last three years perfecting his craft of creating wooden bow ties, a hobby of his that has suddenly become lucrative and changing the fashion game not only in Oxford but across the nation. By Jake Thompson. The Oxford Eagle.

EXCHANGE-CHRISTIAN COFFEE SHOP

BALDWYN, Miss. _ After the busy lunch rush, Tammy Lee, owner of the Baldwyn-based coffee shop Fill My Cup, took some time to chat with the few locals who stopped in for a cup of coffee on a cold day, introducing her staff and making sure everyone was comfortable. Lee completed seminary school, opened an early education center for 120 children at a South Carolina church and later worked as a foster care case worker for the Department of Human Services. Lee became a foster parent herself, adopting a young girl who is now grown. By Cristina Carreon. The Daily Journal.

IN BRIEF:

_ MISSISSIPPI-POLICE LAWSUIT _ A former Mississippi police officer is suing over the loss of his job, saying he faced retaliation after answering a domestic violence call at his boss’s house. SENT: 130 words.

_ SCHOOL BOND ISSUE _ School leaders in a Mississippi Gulf Coast school district will be asked this year to approve $16 million in borrowing to pay for upgrades and repairs. SENT: 130 words.

_ STARKVILLE-INDUSTRIAL PARK _ The Mississippi Court of Appeals is affirming a city’s rezoning of land for an industrial park under construction. SENT: 130 words.

___

If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to

The Atlanta AP Bureau: apatlanta@ap.org

The Columbia AP Bureau: apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau: apalabama@ap.org

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The Jackson AP Bureau: jkme@ap.org

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