AP NEWS

The Latest: Flea-borne typhus outbreak in Pasadena

October 5, 2018

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on a typhus outbreak in Los Angeles County (all times local):

4:30 p.m.

The city of Pasadena is reporting an outbreak of typhus, a day after cases surfaced in neighboring Los Angeles.

The Health Department announced Friday that there have been 20 confirmed cases of typhus among residents this year. Usually, the northern L.A. suburb only gets one to five cases a year.

On Thursday, health officials announced that several cases of typhus have occurred in downtown L.A.

Typhus is caused by bacteria found in infected fleas that can come from many animals, including cats, rats and opossums. Accumulations of trash that attract animals may increase the risk of exposure.

Symptoms can include a high fever, chills, headaches and rashes.

Typhus isn’t contagious between people and is treated with antibiotics.

___

8:12 p.m.

Public health authorities are investigating an outbreak of flea-borne typhus in downtown Los Angeles.

County Health Officer Dr. Muntu Davis announced this week that although typhus can occur throughout the county, several cases have occurred in the downtown area.

Typhus is a disease caused by bacteria found in infected fleas that can come from many kinds of animals including cats, rats and opossums. Symptoms can include high fever, chills, headaches and rashes.

Accumulations of trash that attract animals like rats may increase the risk of exposure.

Typhus is treated with antibiotics. It is not transmitted person-to-person.

AP RADIO
Update hourly