WASHINGTON (AP) _ Joseph Waldholtz, former husband of congresswoman Enid Greene, R-Utah, was ordered jailed immediately today after prosecutors accused him of writing bad checks and using heroin as he awaited sentencing in a $3 million check-kiting scheme.

``This court believes there is one thing it can do, and that is to take you into custody so that you cannot commit additional crimes,'' said U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson.

She ordered that a doctor test Waldholtz for drugs in the courthouse before being taken to the District of Columbia jail. He will remain there until the judge receives medical advice on whether he needs drug treatment.

Waldholtz told the judge he underwent treatment at St. Francis Hospital in Pittsburgh and that he would like to return there. Johnson said she could not do that.

``I have learned a great deal about the disease called addiction, and I have a great deal more to learn,'' Waldholtz said. ``Joe Waldholtz was an honored and honorable person. With treatment, I would like to get that back.''

On June 6, Waldholtz pleaded guilty to four criminal charges: bank fraud, making false statements, failure to report campaign contributions and assisting in filing a fraudulent tax return. Some of the charges stemmed from a $3 million check-kiting scheme when Waldholtz managed his then-wife's 1994 congressional campaign.

He was to have been sentenced this month, but the date was postponed to Oct. 23 at the request of his probation officer. He was released on personal bond after agreeing to live with his father and stepmother in a Pittsburgh suburb and to commit no further crimes, a standard clause in such releases.

``Since he pleaded guilty, he has been in violation of the conditions of his release in a number of different ways,'' said assistant U.S. attorney Craig Iscoe. ``He has used drugs and committed crimes.''

Waldholtz was represented in court by A.J. Kramer, a federal public defender. His own lawyer, Barbara Nicastro, asked to withdraw from today's hearing, explaining her reasons in a bench conference beyond the hearing of others in the courtroom.

The prosecutor told Judge Johnson that Harvey Waldholtz, Joseph's father, did not want his son to live in his home any more and that he has changed the locks on the door.

Neither Waldholtz nor his lawyer contested the allegations brought by the prosecutor.

Iscoe said they included:

_Using heroin daily for two months.

_Forging a prescription for 24 tablets of Vicodin, an addictive pain-killer, on the prescription pad of Harvey Waldholtz, a dentist, telling the pharmacist they were for his grandmother.

_Stealing checks from Marilyn Waldholtz, his stepmother, and forging his father's signature on a $415 check made out to himself.

_Writing seven bad checks to his parents for a total of $24,600. Iscoe told the court that since papers were drawn up listing the violations, the government has learned Waldholtz had written an additional $15,000 in bad checks, for a total $39,600.

_Borrowing the American Express card of a friend, Sara Wells, supposedly to buy a present for his infant daughter Elizabeth. She did not get a present, and Wells got a $550 bill.

_Improperly charging $1,466 to his father's Discovery card, then obtained a new credit card by representing himself as Harvey Waldholtz, and charged another $6,688 on it.

_Wrote a $625 bad check to an optometrist for eyeglasses.

_Rented a Volvo from Hertz in July, then kept the two-day rental for a month until the rental company repossessed it. Harvey Waldholtz was stuck with the bill, more than $2,000.

Kramer asked the judge to return Waldholtz to the hospital in Pittsburgh or place him into a federal institution with medical facilities.

``Then he can continue the treatment he so desperately needs and get the medication he so desperately needs,'' the public defender said.

The government opposed the suggestion. It said Waldholtz, while undergoing treatment earlier, told an FBI agent: ``The court can't touch me here. I'm in a hospital.''