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Moos will get Huskers back ‘where we’re supposed to be,’ says Rimington

July 14, 2018

Former Nebraska All-America center Dave Rimington didn’t spend much time as Nebraska’s interim athletic director — he said he was a “figurehead more than anything” — but he thinks he helped usher the Huskers into a new era.

One of his goals was to influence those who would take over the position after A.D. Shawn Eichorst was fired last fall.

He said Thursday on “The Bottom Line” that Bill Moos was a “home run hire” who will get Nebraska back to the pinnacle of college football.

“We were in a pretty bad situation,” Rimington said. “I just wanted to make sure that we got back on track, and I feel so great about what’s going on with Scott (Frost) and Bill and the administration there. Everybody’s on the same page and everybody’s gonna push. I feel pretty confident, in short order, we’ll be where we’re supposed to be.”

Rimington covered a lot of topics during his “TBL” appearance. He reflected on his time as interim A.D., returning to his work with the Boomer Esiason Foundation, his upcoming youth football camp, the Husker walk-on program and more.

Watch the full video at the top of the page or read a transcript of select excerpts below.

On what he learned while serving as interim A.D.:

“We have some really good people, really dedicated, really hard-working and really competent. I was taking their lead, because they knew what they were doing, and I was there as pretty much a figurehead more than anything else. I just let them do their work and try to get out of their way. If there was any major problems, come to me and we’ll fix it.”

On Moos:

“He’s definitely a home run hire. That was one of my goals. One of the reasons I took the job originally was I wanted to have a little bit of say in what was going to happen next. Because we were in a pretty bad situation. I just wanted to make sure that we got back on track, and I feel so great about what’s going on with Scott and Bill and the administration there. Everybody’s on the same page and everybody’s gonna push, and I feel pretty confident, in short order, we’ll be where we’re supposed to be.”

On his excitement for this football season:

“This is a new beginning. From everything I see, because I’m far away in New York, it seems like they’re just trying as hard as they can to get the right people in to embrace the community, looking for local players, bringing back the walk-on program.”

On the walk-on program:

“I wouldn’t bring it up unless I know it’s going to help this program. I’m not trying to just talk here. We need to get that walk-on program. They’ve got to figure out Title IX to get that to work. But they eventually will, because it needs to be done. That’s one of our advantages here, and we have to take advantage of everything we have.”

On the importance of the offensive line:

“The offensive line is where the action is. That’s the heart and soul of a football team. That’s where you win games. You’ve got to have the speed guys, people who are playmakers, but your offensive line, that’s your rock. You’ve got to have those guys up front in order to really facilitate the greatness behind you and on the sides. ... When you get in the huddle, you look at your offensive line. They’re your leaders. When the chips are down, they’re the guys that are gonna stay focused and confident. It’s not the guys on the outside. You’ve got to have some beef up front that’s going to take over the situation when it’s tough.”

On the Rimington Trophy:

“It’s quite an honor to have something like that named after you. I’m tickled to death that it’s gotten the traction it has with the media. It’s just quite an honor. We come down to Lincoln every January and give out the award. That has raised probably $4-5 million to fighting cystic fibrosis, that trophy alone. It’s been pretty substantial over the years.”

On the 1982 Nebraska football team:

“It was an extraordinary team. We hit a bump at Penn State. We probably should’ve won that game. ... That was a really great team to play for. So much talent. Roger Craig was a backup I-back behind Mike (Rozier) and played a little fullback too. To have that kind of talent all around you — Irving Fryar, Turner Gill, Dean Steinkuhler, myself. We had a great, great team. Jamie Williams, Mitch Krenk, that offense was just loaded with playmakers. Everybody took turns doing really good things on that team. That was a lot of fun.”

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