TOP STORIES:

CIA TORTURE REPORT

WASHINGTON — The CIA and several of its past leaders are stepping up a campaign to discredit a five-year Senate investigation into the CIA's harrowing interrogation practices after 9/11, concerned that the historical record may define them as torturers instead of patriots and expose them to legal action around the world. By Bradley Klapper

AP Photos, video.

CIA-TORTURE REPORT-PSYCHOLOGISTS

WASHINGTON — When the CIA set out to design a program to elicit intelligence from captured terrorists, it turned to two former Air Force psychologists with no practical interrogation experience and no specialized knowledge of al-Qaida, according to a Senate investigation released this week. By Ken Dilanian.

AP Photo.

CLOSING GUANTANAMO

WASHINGTON — Fed up with the stalled progress toward closing the Guantanamo Bay detention center, President Barack Obama summoned top administration officials to the White House for an unusual meeting last month to make it clear he wanted action. By Nedra Pickler and Ben Fox.

SECRET CUBAN HIP-HOP

HAVANA — A U.S. agency secretly infiltrated Cuba's underground hip-hop movement, recruiting unwitting rappers to spark a youth movement against the government, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press. The aim was to use musicians to build a network of young people seeking change, but the operation was amateurish and profoundly unsuccessful. By Desmond Butler, Michael Weissenstein, Laura Wides-Munoz and Andrea Rodriguez.

AP Photos. AP Video.

With: SECRET CUBAN HIP-HOP-5 FINDINGS, SECRET CUBAN HIP-HOP-TIMELINE.

BRAZIL-TRUTH COMMISSION

RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazil takes its most significant step yet to address the human rights violations of its military dictatorship, releasing an exhaustive report that documents nearly two decades of government-approved political killings and torture. By Jenny Barchfield.

AP Photos.

CLIMATE TALKS-ZERO EMISSIONS

LIMA, Peru — For the first time in U.N. climate talks, governments are considering setting an end date for carbon pollution. It's a tall order but if the "net zero emissions" goal becomes part of the global climate pact next year, a London-based lawyer will deserve much of the credit. By Karl Ritter.

AP Photos.

PERU-CLIMATE-GREENPEACE

LIMA, Peru — Greenpeace says its executive director will travel to Peru to personally apologize for the environmental group's stunt at the world-famous Nazca lines, which Peruvian authorities say harmed the archaeological marvel. By Frank Bajak.

AP Photos.

CONGRESS-VENEZUELA SANCTIONS

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Congress has cleared and sent to President Barack Obama legislation directing him to levy sanctions against Venezuelan government officials involved in a crackdown on anti-government protesters. By Deb Riechmann.

BRAZIL-PETROBRAS

SAO PAULO — Brazil's Federal Police agency has asked prosecutors to file charges against 13 people suspected of involvement in the corruption scandal engulfing the state-owned oil company Petrobras. By Stan Lehman.

NICARAGUA-CANAL PROTEST

MANAGUA, Nicaragua — Several thousand people march through Nicaragua's capital to protest a planned $50 billion inter-oceanic canal project that has residents of some villages fearing they will be displaced. By Peter Orsi.

AP Photos.

BUSINESS & FINANCE:

DETROIT BANKRUPTCY

DETROIT — The formalities may be over for Detroit, which officially exited bankruptcy after midnight Thursday and shrugs off the yoke of state receivership. But efforts to make the Motor City livable for residents and appealing to businesses will likely have to last for years to come. By Corey Williams.

AP Photos.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

GARCIA MARQUEZ ARCHIVE

AUSTIN, Texas — The University of Texas refuses to release the contract and purchase price for the archive of Colombian novelist and Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and said it will ask the state attorney general for permission to keep those details secret. By Jim Vertuno.

AP Photo.

PEOPLE-MARK WAHLBERG

NEW YORK — Since it was revealed Mark Wahlberg is seeking a pardon in Massachusetts for assaults he committed as a teen, the actor is well aware that the court of public opinion has weighed in on why he wants one and whether he deserves it. By Alicia Rancilio.

AP Photos.