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GOP’s Hughes Blasts Warren Over Presidential Talk

October 2, 2018

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. Sun staff photos can be ordered by visiting our SmugMug site.

Michael P. Norton

State House News Service

BOSTON -- As she seeks a second six-year term, U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren has tried to tamp down talk that she might be interested in the presidency, until this weekend when she said she’ll take a “hard look” at running for the nation’s highest office in 2020.

Warren’s disclosure plays into the narrative that Republicans, including her opponent Rep. Geoff Diehl, have been promoting -- that Warren isn’t interested in serving Massachusetts in the Senate through 2024 and is more interested in making the leap to a national role.

“Senator Warren has acknowledged a reality that Massachusetts voters have seen for a long time - she’s simply not interested in helping move Massachusetts forward, but is instead using her position to advance her personal, political ambitions,” Massachusetts Republican Party chief Kirsten Hughes said in a statement Tuesday. “Voters have made clear they want a senator who works collaboratively to advance Massachusetts’ priorities -- not abuse their trust to ultimately abandon them in a run for higher office.”

“Senator Warren has acknowledged a reality that Massachusetts voters have seen for a long time - she’s simply not interested in helping move Massachusetts forward, but is instead using her position to advance her personal, political ambitions,” Massachusetts Republican Party chief Kirsten Hughes said in a statement Tuesday. “Voters have made clear they want a senator who works collaboratively to advance Massachusetts’ priorities -- not abuse their trust to ultimately abandon them in a run for higher office.”

A long list of Massachusetts officeholders -- all men -- have unsuccessfully sought the U.S. presidency in recent years, from former Sens. Edward Kennedy (1980), Paul Tsongas (1992), and John Kerry (2004) to former Govs. Michael Dukakis (1988) and Mitt Romney (2008 and 2012).

Citing a need for more women at government’s highest levels, Warren, who won her first term by beating Sen. Scott Brown in 2012, told a town hall crowd in Holyoke last weekend that she will take a “hard look” at running for president after next month’s election.

Warren cited the recent testimony of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her when they were teenagers, before the Senate Judiciary Committee, describing the scene as “powerful men helping a powerful man make it to an even more powerful position.”

“I watched that, and I thought time’s up,” the Cambridge Democrat said, according to a video her campaign posted to Facebook. “It’s time for women to go to Washington and fix our broken government and that includes a woman at the top. So here’s what I promise: after November 6, I will take a hard look at running for president. I think we can do it. I think we can turn this country around.

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