IN THE NEWS: ELECTION SECURITY

BOSTON (AP) — How can the nation make sure its voting system remains secure in the electronic age? According to one panel at the National Academy — the solution lies in going old-school: having all federal, state and local elections done on paper ballots. Another proposal is to have all jurisdictions use a specific form of postelection audits to make sure all votes have been accurately counted. The panel didn't put a price tag on the cost of the proposed overhaul. But New York University's Brennan Center has estimated that replacing aging voting machines over the next few years could cost more than $1 billion.

IN THE NEWS: COLORADO HOLDS ELECTION EXERCIZE

DENVER (AP) — Colorado has held a cybersecurity and disaster exercise to help boost confidence in the upcoming November midterm elections. Cyber experts from the Department of Homeland Security teamed up with dozens of state, county and federal elections officials for yesterday's dry run to weed out possible problems. Homeland Security Secretary Kristjen Nielsen calls election security one of the nation's highest priorities, adding the biggest threats are online from malicious nation-states trying to disrupt democracy.

ON THE WEB: SONY HACKING

CYBERSPACE (AP) — The Justice Department has charged a computer programmer working for the North Korean government with the hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment in 2014. The programmer is identified as Park Jim Hyok. And they say he was also behind the Wannacry ransom-ware attack last year and an $81 million theft from a bank in Bangladesh. Authorities say the charges stem from what they call one of the most cybercriminal investigations conducted by the department.

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Online:

Sony site: http://www.sony.com

by Oscar Wells Gabriel II

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