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Classic, exotics cars headline 2019 Kingwood car show

April 16, 2019

Count on Scott Mosby to bring vehicular beauties to the Kingwood.

The Kingwood dentist is known in his circle as a fan of cars, adopting the particular trait when his great-grandmother bought a new 1957 Chevrolet that he still owns.

He hosted the yearly Spring Car Show, whose latest iteration was running on Saturday in Town Center Park, as a way to spread and share that love.

“We got a lot of great cars here,” Mosby said. An hour into the event, he counted that 109 cars had shown up and taken over the venue.

Aside from staples such as Camaros, Firebirds and Mustangs, Mosby noted that there are new cars at every show, a detail reflecting the region’s automotive scene and — after fall 2017 — the impact of Hurricane Harvey.

Rob Pink of Kingwood lost six cars, one of which is awaiting repairs. For this sunny day, he brought out a modified Datsun 240Z, the same model featured in the popular street-racing manga “Wangan Midnight.”

“I had one when I was young — it’s a car I’ve always liked,” he said, wearing a hat and a shirt with the car’s name on them.

Earlier, Pink could be seen chatting with John Vincent of Porter. Both men had in their collection the De Tomaso Pantera, an Italian sports car that debuted stateside with Ford’s help and appeared in the David Carradine film “Cannonball.”

Vincent bought the car from its Arkansas owner and, by his calculation, it is one of only eight Panteras roaming in Kingwood.

“It looks like an old Lamborghini, but its got an American muscle car in it — that’s a Ford engine in the back — so you can go to O’Reillys and get the spark plugs if you need to,” he said. “You learn to be a mechanic when you own a Pantera.”

Pink added that it’s always fun when, due to the car’s distinct styling and the engine being right behind the driver, people would approach him and wonder what kind of car is it.

Kingwood resident Jeff Norris’ red Lotus Eleven also caught much attention, it being the sole British car at the event. He revealed that the car took 15 years to build, from parts found throughout the U.S and with the assistance of his wife Lizzette and daughter Gabby.

“The way we see it — our friends collect beautiful art, hang it on the wall and then look at it about three times a year,” Jeff said. “Our art sits in our garage, and we drive the heck out of it. We play with them all the time.”

At the event’s end, Mosby gave out trophies to a number of cars for their owners to drive home with.

“It’s just a good party, good family scene,” he said.

nguyen.le@chron.com