FARMINGTON, Utah (AP) — Prosecutors have declined to file criminal charges connected to auditors' findings that a sheriff's office north of Salt Lake City misspent department money and committed time-card fraud.

Prosecutors decided the allegations against the Davis County Sheriff were administrative issues rather than criminal complaints, The Standard-Examiner reported.

The Utah Attorney General's Office prosecutors decided not to file charges because the case wasn't likely to result in a conviction, according to a letter obtained by in a public records request, the newspaper reported Friday.

Auditors had faulted Davis County Sheriff Todd Richardson allowing a deputy to report vacation time as work time in 2016.

He has denied wrongdoing, saying it was a paperwork oversight that happened while he was trying to fulfill a benefits promise he made when hiring an experienced deputy.

The Utah Attorney General's chief criminal deputy, Spencer Austin, said in a letter that it may have been a technical violation, but it has been addressed by the county commission.

Some public officials aren't happy with the outcome. Davis County Attorney Troy Rawlings said it lets public officials know "what we can get away with" in a stinging, sarcastic letter to the Attorney General's Office.

Meanwhile, a second prosecutor declined to file charges over auditors' findings that the undersheriff had misused public money by calling an on-duty deputy to help him when he suffered a medical problem at a vacation spot hours away in 2013. He was treated with a narcotic medication by a paramedic who was also his brother, the county auditor found.

Though the trip to Bear Lake on public time seems inappropriate and probably violates Davis County policy, it doesn't seem like a criminal case, Rich County Attorney Ben Willoughby found.

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Information from: Standard-Examiner, http://www.standard.net