LONDON (AP) — U.K. authorities say hate crimes spiked after Britain's vote to leave the European Union and following several extremist attacks this year, raising concerns about a backlash against Muslims, immigrants and others groups.

Data released by the Home Office shows hate crimes rose 29 percent to 80,393 in the year ended March 31. That included the EU referendum in June 2016 and the attack on Westminster Bridge in March 2017.

Provisional figures also show that racially or religiously motivated offenses rose after attacks on the Manchester Arena, London's Borough Market, and the Finsbury Park Mosque in May and June.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd says "indications that there was a genuine rise in the number of offenses immediately following each of this year's terror attacks is undoubtedly concerning."