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AP Sportlight

August 12, 2018
Aug. 13

1919 — Upset scores a win against Man o’ War in the Sanford Memorial Stakes at Saratoga. The defeat is Big Red’s only loss in 21 starts.

1920 — England’s Ted Ray wins the U.S. Men’s Open golf title.

1933 — Gene Sarazen wins the PGA Championship by defeating Willie Goggin, 5 and 4 in the final round.

1935 — The first roller derby begins in Chicago by promoter Leo Seltzer.

1979 — Lou Brock of the St. Louis Cardinals reaches the 3,000-hit plateau with an infield hit off Chicago Cubs pitcher Dennis Lamp.

1987 — Jackie Joyner-Kersee equals the world record in the women’s long jump with a 24-5½ leap in the Pan American Games at Indianapolis. The record was set in 1986 by Heike Dreschler of East Germany.

1995 — Steve Elkington shoots a final-round 64 and birdies the first sudden-death playoff hole to take the PGA Championship from Colin Montgomerie. Elkington’s 64 is the lowest final round by a PGA Championship winner.

1997 — Wilson Kipketer topples Sebastian Coe’s 16-year-old record in the 800 meters with a time of 1 minute, 41.24 seconds at the Weltklasse Grand Prix in Zurich, Switzerland. Haile Gebrselassie completes one of the greatest nights in track and field in recent memory by pulverizing his own 5,000 record with a time of 12 minutes, 41.86 seconds, improving on his 1995 mark of 12:44.39.

2005 — Hasim Rahman unanimously outpoints friend Monte Barrett on at the United Center in Chicago to win the WBC interim heavyweight championship.

2008 — Michael Phelps swims into history as the winningest Olympic athlete ever with his 10th and 11th career gold medals — and five world records in five events at the Beijing Games. He wins the 200-meter butterfly and swims leadoff for the U.S. 800 freestyle relay team, which shatters the world mark by more than four seconds. Kristin Armstrong wins the women’s time trial, making her the second American women’s cyclist to become an Olympic champion.

2016 — The U.S. women’s 4x100-meter medley relay team of Kathleen Baker, Lilly King, Dana Vollmer and Simone Manuel — winners at the Rio Games — are recognized by the U.S. Olympic Committee as delivering the nation’s 1,000th gold medal in Summer Olympics history. Michael Phelps closes out the Rio Olympics with another gold medal in the butterfly leg of the 4x100 medley relay. Phelps, the most decorated athlete in Olympic history with 23rd career gold medals, finishes his career with 28 medals overall, having won five golds and a silver at these games.

2017 — Justin Thomas emerges from the shadow of a longtime friend and wins the PGA Championship to take his place among the young elite in golf. Thomas closes with a 3-under 68 and wins by two shots. The week began with Jordan Spieth’s quest for a career Grand Slam. Spieth was at the 18th green at Quail Hollow, but only so he could celebrate the moment with Thomas, close friends since they were 14.

Aug. 14

1903 — Jim Jeffries knocks out Jim Corbett in the 10th round to retain his world heavyweight title in San Francisco.

1936 — In Berlin, the United States wins the first Olympic basketball gold medal with a 19-8 win over Canada. The game is played outdoors on a dirt court in a driving rain. Joe Fortenberry leads the US with seven points. James Naismith, the inventor of the game presents the medals.

1959 — The formation of the American Football League is announced in Chicago. Play will begin in 1960 with franchises in six cities with the probability of adding two more teams.

1977 — Lanny Wadkins beats Gene Littler on the third hole of sudden death to take the PGA championship.

1977 — The New York Cosmos, led by Pele, plays before a record crowd of 77,961 at the Meadowlands in East Rutherford, N.J., the most to see a soccer game in the United States. The Cosmos beat the Fort Lauderdale Strikers 8-3 in a NASL quarterfinal playoff game.

1994 — Nick Price wins the PGA Championship in record fashion. Price finished at 11-under 269 for 72 holes, six strokes ahead of Corey Pavin. It is the lowest stroke total in an American major championship.

1996 — Olympic 800- and 1,500-meter champion Svetlana Masterkova of Russia sets a world record in the women’s mile, clocking 4 minutes, 12.56 seconds at the Weltklasse Grand Prix.

2003 — The New York blackout forces the evacuation of workers and players from Shea Stadium hours before the game between the Mets and the San Francisco Giants. It’s the only major league baseball game that was affected by the blackout that stretches from the Northeast to Ohio and Michigan. Elsewhere, two WNBA games are postponed, and Yonkers (N.Y.) Raceway cancels its card.

2005 — The United States 4x400 relay team, anchored by Jeremy Wariner, races to victory and a record 14th gold medal for the United States in the nine-day track and field world championships. The team of Andrew Rock, Derrick Brew, Darold Williamson and Wariner win in 2:56.91.

2011 — Keegan Bradley wins the PGA Championship after staging an amazing comeback to force a three-hole playoff and beat Jason Dufner at Atlanta Athletic Club. Bradley, who trailed by five shots with three holes left, becomes the third player in at least 100 years to win a major championship in his first try.

2015 — Hiroshi Iwata ties a major championship record with a remarkable turnaround — a 77 in the first round, a 63 in the second round of the PGA Championship. It’s the 27th time that a 63 is posted in a major championship, 13 of those in the PGA Championship.

2016 — South African sprinter Wayde van Niekerk breaks Michael Johnson’s 17-year-old world record in the 400-meter final in Rio de Janeiro, leaving two of the greatest one-lap runners of this era in his dust. Van Niekerk finishes in 43.03 seconds — 0.15 seconds faster than Johnson ran in 1999. Usain Bolt becomes the first person to capture three straight 100-meter titles at the Olympics.

Aug. 15

1948 — Babe Didrikson Zaharias wins the U.S. Women’s Open golf title over Betty Hicks.

1950 — Ezzard Charles knocks out Freddie Beshore in the 14th round to retain his world heavyweight title.

1965 — Dave Marr edges Jack Nicklaus and Billy Casper to take the PGA Championship.

1993 — Greg Norman lips his putt on the PGA Championship’s second playoff hole, giving Paul Azinger the title and leaving Norman with an unprecedented career of Grand Slam playoff losses. Norman, despite winning his second British Open title a month earlier, has lost playoffs in three other majors — the 1984 U.S. Open, the 1987 Masters and the 1989 British Open.

1995 — Monica Seles returns to the WTA Tour after a 28-month absence following her 1993 stabbing with a 6-0, 6-3 win over Kimberly Po at the Canadian Open in Toronto.

1999 — Tiger Woods makes a crucial par save on the 17th hole and holds on to win the PGA Championship by one stroke over 19-year-old Sergio Garcia. The 23-year-old Woods becomes the youngest player to win two majors since Seve Ballesteros in 1980.

2004 — In Athens, Greece, the U.S. men’s basketball team loses 92-73 to Puerto Rico, the third Olympic defeat for the Americans and first since adding pros. American teams had been 24-0 since the professional Olympic era began with the 1992 Dream Team. The U.S Olympic team’s record was 109-2, entering the game.

2005 — Phil Mickelson delivers another dramatic finish in a major, flopping a chip out of deep rough to 2 feet for a birdie on the final hole and a one-shot victory in the PGA Championship.

2007 — Former NBA referee Tim Donaghy pleads guilty to felony charges for taking cash payoffs from gamblers and betting on games he officiated in a scandal that rocked the league and raised questions about the integrity of the sport.

2010 — Martin Kaymer wins the PGA Championship in a three-hole playoff against Bubba Watson. Dustin Johnson, with a one-shot lead playing the final hole at Whistling Straits, is penalized two strokes for grounding his club in a bunker on the last hole. The two-shot penalty sends him into a tie for fifth.

2012 — Felix Hernandez pitches the Seattle Mariners’ first perfect game and the 23rd in baseball history, overpowering the Tampa Bay Rays in a brilliant 1-0 victory. It’s the third perfect game in baseball this season — a first — joining gems by Chicago’s Philip Humber against the Mariners in April and San Francisco’s Matt Cain against Houston in June, and the sixth no-hitter.

2012 — The United States defies expectations — and a rowdy crowd elated by Mexico’s Olympic gold — to break a 75-year winless streak at the intimidating Azteca Stadium with an 80th minute goal and a series of saves that deliver a 1-0 victory. Michael Orozco Fiscal’s goal and Tim Howard’s late sprawling saves leaves tens of thousands of opposing fans in stunned silence.

2014 — Mo’Ne Davis, one of two girls at the Little League World Series, throws a two-hitter to help Philadelphia beat Nashville 4-0 in the opener for both teams. Davis, the first girl to appear for a U.S. team in South Williamsport since 2004, has eight strikeouts and doesn’t walk a batter.

Aug. 16

1920 — Cleveland shortstop Ray Chapman is hit in the head with a pitch by New York’s Carl Mays. Chapman suffers a fractured skull and dies the next day. It’s the only field fatality in major league history.

1924 — Helen Wills Moody beats Molla Bjurstedt Mallory again, 6-1, 6-3, to win her second straight singles title at the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association championships.

1954 — The first Sports Illustrated magazine is issued with a 25-cent price tag. The scene on the cover was a game at Milwaukee’s County Stadium. Eddie Mathews of Braves was swinging with Wes Westrum catching and Augie Donatelli umpiring.

1970 — Dave Stockton wins the PGA Championship by two strokes over Arnold Palmer and Bob Murphy at Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa, Okla.

1976 — Dave Stockton edges Raymond Floyd and Don January by one stroke to win his second PGA Championship.

1989 — Tom Drees pitches his third no-hitter of the season for Class AAA Vancouver, leading the Canadians over Las Vegas 5-0 in a seven-inning, first game of a doubleheader in the Pacific Coast League. Drees became the first pitcher in the PCL or the major leagues with three no-hitters in a year.

1992 — Nick Price holds off a comeback bid by Nick Faldo with a 1-under 70 in the final round and captures his first major title with a three-stroke victory in the PGA national championship.

1995 — Ethiopia’s Haile Gebrselassie shatters Kenya’s Moses Kiptanui’s record in the 5,000 by nearly 11 seconds with a time of 12 minutes, 44.39 seconds at the Weltklasse meet in Zurich, Switzerland. Kiptanui smashes his world record in the 3,000-meter steeplechase, becoming the first to break the eight-minute barrier with a time of 7:59.18.

1998 — Jeff Gordon drives into the record book, becoming the seventh driver in modern NASCAR history to win four straight races as he comes from far back to take the Pepsi 400.

2006 — Roger Federer’s 55-match winning streak in North America comes to an end when the world’s top player is upset 7-5, 6-4 by Britain’s Andy Murray in the second round of the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters. Federer’s last loss on the continent also came at the Cincinnati-area event, when Dominik Hrbaty beat him in the first round on Aug. 3, 2004.

2008 — In Beijing, Michael Phelps touches the wall a hundredth of a second ahead of Serbia’s Milorad Cavic to win the 100-meter butterfly. The win gives Phelps his seventh gold medal of the Beijing Games, tying Mark Spitz’s performance in the 1972 Munich Games. Usain Bolt of Jamaica runs the 100-meter dash in a stunning world-record time of 9.69 seconds for a blowout win that he starts celebrating a good 10 strides before the finish line.

2009 — Usain Bolt shatters the 100-meter world record at the World Championships in Berlin. Bolt finishes with a stunning time of 9.58 seconds, bettering his own record of 9.69 seconds set in last year’s Beijing Olympics. American Tyson Gay finishes second with a national record of 9.71 seconds.

2009 — Y.E. Yang of South Korea becomes the first Asian player to win one of golf’s majors with a three-stroke win over Tiger Woods at the PGA Championship. Yang shoots a 2-under 70 and finishes at 8-under 280 and Woods, who led by two strokes when the day began, finishes with a 75.

2014 — Kevin Sutherland becomes the first player in Champions Tour history to shoot a 59. Sutherland’s 59 gives him a one-shot lead over Steve Lowery and is at 14-under 130 at the Dick’s Sporting Goods Open.

Aug. 17

1933 — Lou Gehrig of the New York Yankees plays his 1,308th straight game to break Everett Scott’s record of 1,307.

1938 — Henry Armstrong wins the lightweight title with a 15-round decision over Lou Ambers and becomes the only boxer to hold world championship titles in three weight divisions simultaneously. Armstrong won the featherweight (126-pound) title by knocking out Petey Sarron in six rounds on Oct. 29, 1937. On May 31, 1938, he won the welterweight (147-pound) championship from Barney Ross by a decision.

1960 — Flash Elorde knocks out Harold Gomes at 1:20 in the first round to win the world junior lightweight title.

1969 — Ray Floyd beats Gary Player by one stroke to win the PGA championship.

1995 — John Roethlisberger wins the U.S. National Gymnastics Championships’ all-around title in New Orleans, becoming the first gymnast in 28 years to win four titles.

1997 — Davis Love III shoots a 66 at Winged Foot to win the PGA Championship in Mamaroneck, N.Y., his first major title, by five strokes over Justin Leonard with a 72-hole total of 11-under 269.

2001 — Shingo Katayama shoots a 6-under 64, and David Toms shoots a 65 to share the second-round lead in the PGA Championship. Katayama and Toms at 9-under 131, tie the PGA record for 36 holes last set by Ernie Els at Riviera in 1995.

2005 — The NCAA purchases the rights to the preseason and postseason National Invitation Tournaments as part of a settlement ending a four-year legal fight between the two parties. The 40-team postseason NIT, which is a year older and was once the bigger event, will be run by the NCAA.

2008 — At the Summer Olympics in Beijing, Michael Phelps and three teammates win the 400-meter medley relay for Phelps’ eighth gold medal, eclipsing Mark Spitz’s seven-gold performance at the 1972 Munich Games. Of his five individual races and three relays, Phelps sets world records in seven and an Olympic record in the eighth.

2013 — Nick Davilla throws six touchdown passes and the Arizona Rattlers defeat the Philadelphia Soul 48-39 in the Arena Bowl.

2014 — Inbee Park successfully defends her title in the LPGA Championship, beating Brittany Lincicome with a par on the first hole of a playoff to end the United States’ major streak at three.

2015 — The National Labor Relations Board dismisses a historic ruling that Northwestern University football players are school employees who are entitled to form what would be the nation’s first union of college athletes.

2016 — Jamaica’s Elaine Thompson completes the first 100-200 women’s Olympic double since 1988. Thompson wins the 200 in 21.78 seconds to become the first woman since Marion Jones in 2000 to win both Olympic sprints. Jones’ records have since been stripped, so Thompson goes in the record book along with Florence Griffith-Joyner, who starred in the 1988 Seoul Games. Brianna Rollins, Nia Ali and Kristi Castlin finish 1-2-3 in the 100-meter hurdles to give the United States its first sweep in the event, its seventh in the history of Olympic track and the 23rd for U.S. women, regardless of sport, over the history of the Summer Games.

Aug. 18

1923 — Helen Mills, 17, ends Molla Bjurstedt Mallory’s domination of the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association championships and starts her own with a 6-2, 6-1 victory.

1958 — Floyd Patterson knocks out Roy Harris in the 13th round at Wrigley Field in Los Angeles to retain his world heavyweight title.

1964 — The International Olympic Committee bans South Africa from competing in the Summer Olympics because of its apartheid policies.

1994 — South Africa is introduced for the first time in 36 years during the opening ceremonies of the 15th Commonwealth Games held in Victoria, British Columbia. South Africa had been banned from the Games since 1958 because of its apartheid policies.

1995 — Thirteen-year-old Dominique Moceanu becomes the youngest to win the National Gymnastics Championships senior women’s all-around title in New Orleans.

2000 — Tiger Woods ties the 36-hole scoring record in the PGA Championship with a 5-under 67 to take a one-stroke lead over unheralded Scott Dunlap. Woods, at 11-under 133, ties the mark for relation to par last set by Mark O’Meara and Ernie Els in 1995.

2004 — Paul Hamm wins the men’s gymnastics all-around Olympic gold medal by the closest margin ever in the event. Controversy follows after it was discovered a scoring error that may have cost Yang Tae-young of South Korea the men’s all-around title. Yang, who finished with a bronze, is wrongly docked a tenth of a point on his second-to-last routine, the parallel bars. He finishes third, 0.049 points behind Hamm, who becomes the first American man to win gymnastics’ biggest prize.

2008 — A day after winning an Olympic gold medal in Beijing, Rafael Nadal officially unseats Roger Federer to become the world’s No. 1 tennis player when the ATP rankings are released. Federer had been atop the rankings for 235 weeks.

2013 — For the first time in Solheim Cup history, the Europeans leaves America with the trophy. Caroline Hedwall becomes the first player in the 23-year history of the event to win all five matches. She finishes with a 1-up victory over Michelle Wie and gives Europe the 14 points it needed to retain the cup.

2013 — Usain Bolt is perfect again with three gold medals. The Jamaican great becomes the most successful athlete in the 30-year history of the world championships. The 4x100-meter relay gold erases the memories of the 100 title he missed out on in South Korea two years ago because of a false start. Bolt, who already won the 100 and 200 meters, gets his second such sprint triple at the world championships, matching the two he achieved at the Olympics. With his victory, Bolt moves to the top of the all-time world championships medals table with eight gold and two silver, edging Carl Lewis, who had eight gold, one silver and one bronze.

2016 — Jamaica’s Usain Bolt completes an unprecedented third consecutive sweep of the 100- and 200-meter sprints, elevating his status as the most decorated male sprinter in Olympic history. He wins the 200-meter race with a time of 19.78 seconds to defeat Andre de Grasse of Canada. He already claimed gold in the 100 in Rio. American Ashton Eaton defends his Olympic decathlon title, equaling the games record with a surge on the last lap of the 1,500 meters — the last event in the two-day competition.

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