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Sketches Of Winners In Journalism Categories With AM-Pulitzers Bjt

April 18, 1986

NEW YORK (AP) _ Following are biographical sketches of the winners of 1986 Pulitzer Prizes in journalism:

Edna Buchanan, The Miami Herald, general news reporting. Ms. Buchanan, 40, covers crime for the Herald, where she has been a staff writer for 12 years. She broke the story of the death of Arthur McDuffie, a black man who allegedly was beaten to death by white police. The officers were acquitted. She also was first to report on a highway patrolman who allegedly sexually molested a young girl. The trooper was indicted and remains a fugitive.

Ms. Buchanan won the 1979-80 Paul Hansell Award for Distinguished Journalism from the Florida Society of Newspaper Editors. She won awards from the American and Florida Bar Associations, the Florida Press Club and the Florida Society of Newspaper Editors.

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Jeffrey A. Marx, the Lexington (Ky.) Herald-Leader, investigative reporting. Marx, 23, is a 1984 graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. He joined the staff of the Herald-Leader in 1984. He was the paper’s coal writer at the time he was assigned to work on the University of Kentucky basketball series.

Marx, born in New York City, first reported on sports while working as a summer assistant with the Baltimore Colts of the National Football League.

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Michael York, the Lexington (Ky.) Herald-Leader, investigative reporting. York, 32, has been a reporter for the Lexington newspapers since 1979, and the papers’ Washington correspondent since 1982.

Born in High Point, N.C., he is a 1974 graduate of the University of Kentucky and a 1978 graduate of the University of North Carolina School of Law. York was a reporter for the Durham (N.C.) Morning Herald from 1975-78 and for the Legal Times of Washington in 1978.

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Andrew Schneider, The Pittsburgh Press, specialized reporting. Schneider, 43, joined The Press in 1984 and is an investigative reporter in public health.

He began his career in 1960 as a writer-photographer with the Army, and later became a stringer for United Press International. As a free-lance magazine writer and photographer, he covered the Vietnam War. He later was named managing editor of a chain of bi-weekly newspapers owned by Journal Newspapers.

In 1975, he began a six-year stint with The Associated Press as a special projects reporter. He was also director of research for the Technological Hazards Research Group at the University of Lowell in Massachusetts.

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Mary Pat Flaherty, The Pittsburgh Press, specialized reporting. Ms. Flaherty, 30, is a Pittsburgh native who attended Northwestern University’s School of Journalism and joined the Press as a summer intern in 1975. She became a permanent staff member upon graduating in 1977.

Ms. Flaherty has won numerous awards, including a second place as the Scripps Howard Writer of the Year in 1981.

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Craig Flournoy, The Dallas Morning News, national reporting. Flournoy, 34, was born in Shreveport, La., and graduated from the University of New Orleans in 1975. He joined the Morning News in 1978, where his work included an expose of a housing department, an examination of a public housing renovation project, and a series showing that a gas company had neglected to maintain its pipeline system.

Flournoy worked at the Shreveport (La.) Journal. He also worked at the Courier, a New Orleans weekly, where he wrote an articles on the parish prison, which won him Louisiana Press Association awards.

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George Rodrigue, The Dallas Morning News, national reporting. Rodrigue, 29, has been an urban affairs reporter for the Morning News since 1983. He worked as an associated editor of D Magazine in Dallas from 1981-83, and was county courthouse and City Hall reporter for The Atlanta Constitution from 1978-81. He graduated in 1978 from the University of Virginia.

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Arthur Howe, The Philadelphia Inquirer, national reporting. Howe, 36, joined the Inquirer in 1980 after working for five years as a reporter for the Wilmington (Del.) News Journal, Bulletin and other regional newspapers.

From 1982-84, he opened and ran the Inquirer’s Wall Street bureau.

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Howe is a 1972 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. He is to graduate this month from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania with a master’s degree in corporate finance.

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Pete Carey, San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News, international reporting. Carey, 45, has been with the Mercury News since 1967, serving as aerospace writer, special assignments writer and investigative reporter. Before that, he was editor of the Livermore (Calif.) Independent and was a reporter at the San Francisco Examiner.

Raised in Berkeley, Calif., Carey holds a degree in economics from the University of California at Berkeley. He was a 1983-84 Professional Journalism Fellow at Stanford University.

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Katherine Ellison, San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News, international reporting. Ellison, 28, has worked for the Mercury News for five years, the last two in the San Francisco bureau. She has a bachelor’s degree from Stanford University. She has held internships at Foreign Policy magazine, the Center for Investigative Reporting, Los Angeles Times and Washington Post.

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Lewis M. Simons, San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News, international reporting. Simons, 47, has served as Tokyo correspondent for the San Jose Mercury News for three years. Simons has reported extensively on Japan, South Korea, Vietnam and the Philippines.

Simons had worked at The Washington Post as correspondent in India and Thailand. He began his career in 1964 as a reporter for The Associated Press.

In 1970-71, Simons was an Edward R. Murrow Fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.

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John Camp, St. Paul (Minn.) Pioneer Press and Dispatch, feature writing. Camp, 41, joined the Pioneer Press and Dispatch in 1978. Before that, he spent almost eight years as a reporter and editor for The Miami Herald, where his feature story on Minnesota Indians was a Pulitzer finalist in 1980. He began his reporting career in 1967 as editor of a U.S. Army newspaper in Korea. He also served as a general assigment reporter for the Cape Girardeau (Mo.) Southeast Missourian. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Iowa at Iowa City.

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Jimmy Breslin, New York Daily News, commentary. Breslin, 55, has worked for the New York Herald Tribune, the New York Journal American and The Boston Globe. A native New Yorker, Breslin joined the Tribune in 1963 as a columnist. He has won numerous awards, including the Meyer Berger award from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism for local reporting. He writes on a variety of subjects, from politics to the assassination of John F. Kennedy to the accident at Three Mile Island.

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Donal J. Henahan, The New York Times, criticism. Henahan, 65, has been a music critic for the Times since he joined the newspaper in September 1967. Born in Cleveland, Henahan attended Kent State University and Ohio University until World War II intervened. He served as an Air Force fighter pilot in Europe.

After the war, Henahan earned a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University. In 1947, he joined the news staff of The Chicago Daily News, becoming chief music critic there in 1957. His musical education included training as a pianist, a singer and a classical guitarist.

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Jack Fuller, The Chicago Tribune, editorial writing. Fuller, 39, was a lawyer, reporter and Washington correspondent before becoming an editorial page writer for the Tribune in 1978. He rose to editor in 1983.

Fuller was born in Chicago and graduated from Northwestern University’s journalism school in 1968. He earned a law degree at Yale University.

From 1973-74, Fuller was a reporter on the Tribune’s city desk. He served as a Washington correspondent in 1977. Fuller is a member of the Illinois Bar and has written three novels.

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Jules Feiffer, The Village Voice, editorial cartooning. Feiffer’s first published cartoon appeared in the Voice on the paper’s first birthday, in 1956, and his satirical strip is still a weekly feature.

Born in New York City in 1929, Feiffer attended Pratt Institute. He has published numerous volumes of his cartoons and is the author-editor of ″The Great Comic Book heroes,″ a memoir of his early literary influences.

Feiffer has also written for the stage and screen. His first full-length play, ″Little Murders,″ was produced by Alan Arkin in 1967. Feiffer has also written three films: ″Little Murders,″ ″Carnal Knowledge″ and ″Popeye.″

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Michel duCille, The Miami Herald, spot news photography. DuCille, 30, was born in Kingston, Jamaica. He joined the Herald photo staff in September 1981, the same year he graduated from Indiana University with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Upon graduating, duCille won a Ross Hazeltine travel grant, which he used on a three-month photography trip through Jamaica.

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Carol Guzy, The Miami Herald, spot news photography. Guzy, 28, has been a staff photographer for The Herald for two years. Before that, she served an internship at the paper’s Broward bureau. She holds an associate’s degree in nursing from Northampton County Area Community College in Bethlehem, Pa., and an associate’s degree in applied science from the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

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Tom Gralish, The Philadelphia Inquirer, feature photography. Gralish, 29, has worked as a staff photographer and picture editor for the Inquirer since 1983. In 1984, he photographed the Democratic presidential primary campaigns and documented the life of a Philadelphia family and how it was affected by the events of the election year. Gralish also spent seven years as a photographer for United Press International.

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