ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A faith-based charity says it was asked last week by federal immigration authorities to assist and provide services to migrant families in Albuquerque after their reunification at a detention center in southern New Mexico.

Jim Barclay, the president and CEO of Lutheran Family Services, Rocky Mountains, says he was told 12 migrants — the first of roughly 300 parents and children expected in Albuquerque this week — would arrive later Tuesday from the Otero County Processing Center, where some parents were being reunited with children.

The organization says it was told Friday to prepare immediately to receive migrants, but that the arrivals had been delayed. He says he wasn't certain why.

A judge has set a Thursday deadline for the Trump administration to reunite all older children with parents after their separations at the U.S.-Mexico border.