PHOENIX (AP) — The Latest on Arizona's primary election and the U.S. Senate race (all times local):

5:37 p.m.

David Brill has won the Democratic nomination for a western Arizona House district.

Brill beat Delina DiSanto and write-in candidate Ana Maria Perez in Tuesday's primary. He'll challenge incumbent Republican Rep. Paul Gosar, who is currently serving his fourth term. Gosar was unopposed in the primary.

Brill is a physician who spent 10 years working for the Veterans Administration, including seven years at the Prescott VA.

Arizona's 4th Congressional District is staunchly Republican The district covers the western part of Arizona and reaches into the central part of the state.

Haryaksha Gregor Knauer ran as a Green Party candidate.

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9:05 a.m.

Retired Air Force pilot Wendy Rogers has won a three-way Republican primary in Arizona's 1st Congressional District.

Rogers beat state Sen. Steve Smith and farmer-attorney Tiffany Shedd in Tuesday's primary.

The seat covers a large portion of Arizona, including the Navajo Nation, Flagstaff and suburbs north of Tucson. It was drawn to be competitive but has leaned Democrat since 2012.

Rogers spent 20 years in active duty and started a small business when she retired in 1996. She lives in Flagstaff.

She will face incumbent Democratic Rep. Tom O'Halleran in November. The one-term O'Halleran was unopposed in his primary.

More than 200 polling places were not working Tuesday morning for Arizona's primary election. Officials say a contractor hired to set up voting machines in the Phoenix area failed to send enough technicians. (Aug. 28)

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12:05 a.m.

Speech therapist Kathy Hoffman is the Democratic nominee for Arizona Superintendent of Public Instruction.

She beat former state lawmaker and high school administrator David Shapira in Tuesday's primary.

Incumbent Diane Douglas trailed in a five-way Republican primary behind education professor Bob Branch and former California congressman Frank Riggs. As of late Tuesday, the race was too close to call.

Education is a top-of-mind-issue for Arizona voters this year. Teachers this spring went on a historic six-day walkout to demand increased pay and classroom funding.

Both Republican and Democratic candidates running against Douglas claimed she failed to effectively lead the Arizona Department of Education at a time when educators were frustrated enough to storm the Capitol.

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11:50 p.m.

Lea Marquez Peterson won a four-way primary to become the Republican nominee for a congressional district seat being vacated by Arizona Rep. Martha McSally.

Marquez Peterson beat Brandon Martin, Danny Morales and Casey Welch in Tuesday's primary for Arizona's 2nd Congressional District.

Republican McSally is running for retiring Sen. Jeff Flake's seat.

The district covers the southeastern corner of Arizona from most of Tucson down to the U.S-Mexico border. It has almost an equal number of registered Democrats and Republicans. Democrats hope to flip the seat in their bid to take control of the House of Representatives.

Marquez Peterson is the CEO of the Tucson Hispanic Chamber. She'll face off with the winner of a seven-way Democratic primary in November.

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9:30 p.m.

State Sen. Kimberly Yee has won the Republican primary race for state treasurer.

The Senate Majority Leader was declared the winner Tuesday night, beating political novice Jo Ann Sabbagh.

The conservative legislator was the favorite to win. She received several endorsements including from U.S. Reps. Andy Biggs and Debbie Lesko and five former state treasurers.

Sabbagh, a public accountant from Tucson, campaigned on the idea that the treasurer should be more than a stepping stone for someone seeking higher office.

Yee worked in the State Treasurer's Office from 2007 to 2010.

She will face unopposed Democratic candidate Mark Manoil in November.

The current treasurer, Eileen Klein, was appointed to the position after State Treasurer Jeff DeWitt resigned to become the chief financial officer for NASA last March.

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9:24 p.m.

Ann Kirkpatrick won a seven-way primary to become the Democratic nominee for a congressional district seat being vacated by Arizona Rep. Martha McSally.

Republican McSally won the primary Tuesday to seek retiring Sen. Jeff Flake's seat.

The district covers the southeastern corner of Arizona from most of Tucson down to the U.S-Mexico border. It has almost an equal number of registered Democrats and Republicans. Democrats hope to flip the seat in their bid to take control of the House of Representatives.

Kirkpatrick is a former congresswoman who represented a northern Arizona district and once ran for U.S. Senate.

She'll face off with the winner of a four-way Republican primary in November.

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9:06 p.m.

Steve Ferrara won a three-way primary to become the Republican nominee for an open Arizona House seat.

He beat recurring candidate Dave Giles and longtime resident Irina Baroness Von Behr in Tuesday's primary. The seat, Arizona's 9th Congressional District, is currently held by Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, who is running for U.S. Senate.

In November, he'll face off with former Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton, who ran on the Democratic ticket unopposed.

Ferrara is a former Navy chief medical officer who spent more than two decades in the military. He's campaigned with a moderate approach, saying he wouldn't participate in the Freedom Caucus and focus on finding solutions.

The district covers parts of Phoenix and suburbs to the east. It went for Hillary Clinton in 2016, but it has more unaffiliated voters than Republicans or Democrats.

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8:55 p.m.

Arizona Secretary of State Michele Reagan has lost her re-election bid in a Republican primary to businessman Steve Gaynor.

Gaynor, who owns a printing plant in Los Angeles, beat Reagan in Tuesday's primary.

He campaigned on running a more efficient office, focusing on elections division.

Reagan is a former state lawmaker who has championed increased online processes for those who use the office's services.

During her first term, she launched a new website aimed at increasing transparency for political donations.

Gaynor criticized the site as a poor use of tax dollars.

The latest round of campaign finance reports show Gaynor, a largely self-funded candidate who made multiple loans to his campaign, spent around $967,000 from July through mid-August.

Reagan spent around $182,000.

Gaynor will face unopposed Democrat Katie Hobbs in November.

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8:44 p.m.

Rep. Martha McSally has won the Republican primary for Arizona's open U.S. Senate seat and will face Rep. Kyrsten Sinema in November.

She defeated former state Sen. Kelli Ward and former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio in Tuesday's primary.

McSally is an Air Force veteran who was the first female fighter pilot to fly in combat. She's represented a southern Arizona district covering parts of Tucson and rural Cochise County since 2015.

Many political observers predicted McSally would emerge as the nominee with Ward and Arpaio splitting up the state's most conservative voters.

Arizona has an open Senate seat this cycle after Republican Sen. Jeff Flake decided to not run for re-election. The seat is considered a key pickup for Democrats in their bid to take control of the chamber.

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8:37 p.m.

Education professor and military veteran David Garcia is the Democratic nominee for Arizona governor.

He beat state Sen. Steve Farley and Kelly Fryer, former CEO of the YWCA Southern Arizona in Tuesday's primary. He'll face Republican Gov. Doug Ducey in November

Garcia emphasizes increasing funds for public schools and establishing more sustainable energy sources. He's a professor at the education school at Arizona State University and a fourth-generation Arizona resident.

Garcia has also pointed out the historical relevance of his candidacy: a Latino hasn't won statewide office in Arizona since Gov. Rául Castro was elected in 1974.

Garcia emerged as the front-runner in the primary this summer. The Republican Governors Association already as aired attack ads against Garcia linking him to calls to abolish Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

8:29 p.m.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey beat a Republican challenger in the primary round of his re-election bid.

Ducey bested former Secretary of State Ken Bennett, a more conservative GOP candidate who had little funding and campaign resources, in Tuesday's primary.

Ducey's re-election bid has focused on border security and job creation. He's touted the new law enforcement collaboration effort called the Border Strike Force as well as multiple companies who've located in Arizona during his first term.

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8:24 p.m.

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema has won the Democratic nomination for Arizona's US Senate seat, a largely expected victory for the centrist Democrat.

Sinema defeated community activist Deedra Abboud in Tuesday's primary. She'll face the winner of a three-way Republican primary in November.

Sinema is currently serving her third term in the House of Representatives.

In her Senate campaign, Sinema focused on affordable health care and her willingness to work across the aisle. She had a significant cash advantage and deep well of establishment support.

Arizona has an open U.S. Senate seat this cycle after Republican Sen. Jeff Flake decided to not run for re-election. The seat is considered a key potential pickup for Democrats in their bid to take control of the chamber.

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7:20 p.m.

The polls are closed for Arizona's primary election, but some people are still waiting to cast votes.

Social media video shows long lines of voters outside public libraries in Tempe and Phoenix.

Since they were in line before the polls closed at 7 p.m. Tuesday, they will be allowed to vote.

Most voters cast their ballots early.

However, some voters who waited to vote until Tuesday morning faced problems in the Phoenix metro area.

Several locations opened hours behind schedule because voting machines had not been set up on time.

The office of Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes says 62 polling places didn't open on time, but all were operating by 11:30 a.m.

The county has about 750 locations.

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7 p.m.

The polls are now closed for Arizona's primary election.

Most voters cast their ballots early but polling places across the state opened at 6 a.m. Thursday and closed at 7 p.m.

However, some voters faced problems at Phoenix-area polling places.

Several locations opened hours behind schedule because voting machines had not been set up on time.

The office of Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes says 62 polling places didn't open on time, but all were operating by 11:30 a.m.

The county has about 750 locations.

The head of elections in Arizona called on the county to seek a court order to keep the polls open later, but leaders opted against the move.

No voting machine problems were reported in other parts of the state.

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8:45 a.m.

Problems are reported at multiple polling places in metro Phoenix as voters cast election-day ballots in Arizona's primary election.

Local media outlets reported that equipment and other setup problems at multiple polling places prevented or delayed some voters from casting ballots Tuesday morning. Some reports indicated that the problems were being resolved.

The extent of the problems wasn't clear and a spokeswoman for Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes did not immediately respond to multiple phone and email inquiries from The Associated Press.

Media outlets reported that the problems occurred in cities such as Phoenix, Mesa, Chandler and Scottsdale.

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7:15 a.m.

Election-day voting is underway in Arizona's primary, which includes a three-way race for the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Republican Jeff Flake, who is not running for re-election.

Most primary election voters cast their ballots early but polling places across the state opened at 6 a.m. and are scheduled to remain open until 7 p.m.

Republicans vying to replace Flake include U.S. Rep. Martha McSally, former state legislator Kelli Ward and former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

U.S. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema faces attorney and community activist Deedra Abboud in the Democratic primary for Senate.

Voters also are picking nominees for nine U.S. House seats, governor and other state offices.

6:20 a.m.

Arizona's Republicans on Tuesday will decide a three-way battle over which candidate to nominate to replace the state's junior U.S. Senator, who is retiring because he has no political future after criticizing President Trump.

The president has dominated the race to replace Sen. Jeff Flake even though he's refrained from endorsing any of the three candidates.

The overwhelming favorite is Rep. Martha McSally, a onetime Trump critic from a swing district who's touted her growing bond with the president at every turn.

McSally is favored because opposition to her on the right is split between two insurgent candidates, former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and former State Senator Kelli Ward.