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Our View: Salscheider, instrumental on lake issues, sails into retirement

November 7, 2018

The Lake Havasu Marine Association has big flippers to fill. Jim Salscheider announced his retirement from the organization after a decade as president.

Under Salscheider’s guidance, the Marine Association took a leadership role on many issues of high importance to anyone who calls this area home.

Some highlights:

• The Marine Association launched an aggressive campaign to stop the spread of aquatic invasive species — particularly the quagga mussel. Salscheider & Co. worked with Arizona Department of Game & Fish to create the “Don’t Move a Mussel” sticker campaign — a simple idea, but one that proved effective in raising public awareness about the dangers of the frustrating little bivalve.

• Over the last two years, as the number of deadly accidents on the lake increased to concerning levels, Salscheider sprang into action to reintroduce a wristband program designed to promote sober boating.

• When the federal government threatened to add new boating restrictions near the areas of the Havasu National Wildlife Refuge, Salscheider was one of the loudest voices in opposition. (And ultimately that push-back was successful in keeping our lake a welcoming environment for power boaters).

• In January, the Marine Association was honored with the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s “Award for Excellence,” and this year participated in the first-ever mapping of Lake Havasu’s depths.

All of that happened with the last few years. The Marine Association is also responsible for maintaining buoys throughout the lake, and it distributes litter bags at campsites up and down the Colorado River, with an aim of keeping the lakeside free of trash.

The Marine Association has already announced Salscheider’s successor, and we’re excited to see what new president Alan Oleson has planned for the organization, but it’s pretty clear there’s no replacing him. Indeed, Salscheider’s commitment to promoting Lake Havasu has helped grow the Marine Association into one of the region’s most important institutions. Luckily, he’s planning to stick around as the association’s chairman of the board, and he’s sure to be a great resource for Oleson as they work to make the transition as seamless as possible.

— Today’s News-Herald

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