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Today in Arizona History

January 2, 2019

PHOENIX (AP) — Sunday, Jan. 6

On this date in 1880, Tom Mix, famous early Western movie star who at one time lived in Arizona, was born.

On this date in 1881, a post office was established in Galeyville, a town that became a notorious outlaw hangout. Its leading citizen was Curly Bill Brocius.

On this date in 1894, the Prescott police chief and the town constable fought a gun duel over an arrest made by the constable. The police chief was shot twice and seriously wounded.

On this date in 1912, the Montezuma Oil Co., in which Buffalo Bill Cody owned a part interest, began drilling operations in a search for oil near Agua Caliente Springs in Maricopa County. Other companies were also exploring near Fort Huachuca and Vail.

On this date in 1975, Raul Castro becomes Arizona’s first Hispanic governor.

Monday, Jan. 7

On this date in 1912, Gov. Richard E. Sloan wrote to the governors of every state in the Union asking each of them to declare that Arizona’s Admission Day be observed as a national holiday.

On this date in 1947, Henry Chee Dodge, the first chairman of the Navajo Tribal Council, died at Sage Memorial Hospital at age 86.

Tuesday, Jan. 8

On this date in 1774, Juan Bautista de Anza and Fr. Francisco Garces set out from Tubac with a party of 34 men to establish a route to California. They traveled to Monterey by way of El Camino del Diablo and returned by the Gila River.

On this date in 1906, the Arizona Supreme Court judges wore black robes for the first time.

On this date in 1929, the Lee’s Ferry Bridge was opened across the Colorado River at Marble Canyon.

On this date in 2011, a shooting outside a Tucson supermarket leaves six people dead and 13 others, including Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, wounded.

Wednesday, Jan. 9

On this date in 1847, the Mormon Battalion crossed the Colorado River into California after opening the first wagon route across southern Arizona from Santa Fe to San Diego.

On this date in 1908, Tucson City Council ordered all saloons to close at midnight from now on.

On this date in 1912, tax assessors of Arizona, meeting at Douglas, spent most of the day in a stormy session debating the taxable worth of burros. After considerable argument, a tax of $5 per head was agreed upon.

On this date in 1917, the state Legislature banned the public drinking cup and common towel and established a minimum weekly wage for women of $10.

On this date in 1932, the decapitated skeleton of Adolph Ruth was found. Six months earlier, he had gone into the Superstition Mountain Range in search of the fabled Lost Dutchman Mine.

Thursday, Jan. 10

On this date in 1828, Henry C. Hooker, who established the famous Sierra Bonita Ranch in Graham County, was born in New Hampshire.

On this date in 1912, Globe residents concerned over the high costs of living were relieved to learn that local barbers weren’t increasing Saturday haircuts to 75 cents.

Friday, Jan. 11

On this date in 1908, the Grand Canyon National Monument was established.

On this date in 1921, electric street cars were installed in Mesa.

On this date in 1921, Mayor James A. Harrison of Nogales narrowly escaped death when a bullet fired by a policeman at an escaping burglar entered his bedroom window and lodged in the footboard of his bed.

Saturday, Jan. 12

On this date in 1883, the Southern Pacific Railroad tracks were completed so that Tucson could be reached from the East Coast by way of the San Antonio.

On this date in 1921, a fire in Payson destroyed two residences, a warehouse, a dance hall, a barn, a hotel and a restaurant. The entire town fought the blaze for more than two hours to prevent further damage.

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