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BC-TX--Texas News Digest 12 am, TX

April 10, 2019

Good morning! Here’s a look at AP’s general news coverage in Texas at this hour. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the Dallas AP at 972-991-2100, or, in Texas, 800-442-7189. Email: aptexas@ap.org. Jill Bleed is at the desk after 5:30 a.m.

Reminder: This information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Central.

For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

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TOP STORIES:

ELECTION 2020-YOUNG VOTERS

GRINNELL, Iowa _ Austin Anderson was excited to see Beto O’Rourke on his college campus last week, intrigued by his “character” and talk of bipartisanship. But would he support the former Texas congressman in next year’s Iowa caucuses? “It doesn’t feel like it’s at the top of the list,” the Iowa State University senior said. “I’m looking for a job right now. I’m, like, a dumb 21-year-old who worries about girls … and schoolwork. I don’t know, it feels extra at times.” Anderson represents the challenge for O’Rourke and other 2020 Democratic presidential candidates who are making appeals to young voters a central part of their campaign. The White House hopefuls can soak up the energy of young crowds at campus rallies, but that doesn’t necessarily translate into support on Election Day. By Alexandra Jaffe. UPCOMING: 850 words.

ELECTION 2020-MEDICARE FOR ALL

WASHINGTON _ Several independent studies of Medicare for All have estimated that it would dramatically increase government spending on health care, in the range of about $25 trillion to $35 trillion or more over a 10-year period. But a recent estimate from the Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst suggests that the cost could be much lower. Neera Tanden, president of the Center for American Progress Action Fund, noted the emphasis by most Medicare for All supporters on “multiple pathways” to universal coverage as a potential point of contrast and “fodder for debate” with Sen. Bernie Sanders. In the absence of former Vice President Joe Biden, who has yet to launch a candidacy, Sanders is leading the Democratic field in early fundraising and campaigning as a front-runner. “I think it really matters what you say to voters. That’s the most important thing,” Tanden said. Her group has proposed a more robust version of the public option known as “Medicare for America,” which is supported by former Texas congressman and Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke. By Elana Schor and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar. SENT: 1000 words.

IMMIGRATION:

TRUMP-IMMIGRATION

WASHINGTON _ Facing bipartisan pushback, President Donald Trump has said he’s not looking to revive the much-criticized practice of separating migrant children from their families at the southern border. At the same time, he suggested the policy had worked to deter migrants from coming into the U.S. Last summer the administration had separated more than 2,500 children from their families before international outrage forced Trump to halt the practice and a judge ordered them reunited. By Colleen Long and Jill Colvin. SENT: 930 words, photos, video. Moved on national political news services.

With:

_ TRUMP-IMMIGRATION-THE LATEST

_ TRUMP-IMMIGRATION-FACT CHECK _ President Donald Trump is wholly mispresenting the immigration detention policy he introduced that forced migrant children from their parents at the border. “President Obama had child separation,” Trump said. “I’m the one that stopped it.” In fact, he stopped _ or at least suspended _ family separations that spiked as a result of his own “zero-tolerance” policy. By Calvin Woodward and Nomaan Merchant. SENT: 560 words, photos, video. Moved on national political news services.

BORDER BOTTLENECK

CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico _ To deal with a surge of migrating Central American families, the Trump administration has reassigned so many inspectors from U.S.-Mexico border crossings that truckers are waiting in line for hours and sometimes days to get shipments to the United States. Truckers have been sleeping in their vehicles to hold spots in line in Ciudad Juarez, across the border from El Paso, Texas. The city brought in portable toilets, and an engine oil company hired models in skin-tight clothing to hand out burritos and bottled water to idled drivers. “My family doesn’t recognize me at home anymore,” Jaime Monroy, a trucker who lives in Ciudad Juarez, said after sleeping overnight in his cabin with a truck full of wooden furniture. “I leave at 3 in the morning and come back at 10 at night.” By Cedar Attanasio. SENT: 840 words, photos. Moved on general and financial news services.

IMMIGRATION-DETAINEE DIES

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. _ An autopsy has concluded a Honduran transgender migrant who died while in the custody of U.S. federal immigration officials died of complications from AIDS. The New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator has released its findings on the death of 33-year-old Roxsana Hernandez whose mysterious 2018 death in Albuquerque sparked protests. According to the autopsy, the cause of death was multicentric Castleman disease due to AIDS. Multicentric Castleman disease is a rare disorder of the immune system. By Russell Contreras. SENT: 410 words, photos.

TEXAS GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS:

COLLEGE ADMISSIONS-RACE

LUBBOCK, Texas _ Race will no longer be factored into admissions at Texas Tech University’s medical school following an agreement with the Trump administration, potentially previewing how other complaints over affirmative action are handled under Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. The resolution resolves a complaint filed in 2004 against Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. But notably, the resolution is the first of its kind under the Trump administration, which last year rescinded Obama-era guidelines meant to promote diversity among students. SENT: 300 words.

Also:

_ TEXAS BUDGET _ Every teacher in Texas would get a $5,000 raise under a spending bill approved by the state Senate, but any pay hike still has a long path to Gov. Greg Abbott’s desk. SENT: 120 words.

_ ABORTION RIGHTS-TEXAS _ A measure in Texas that threatens doctors with prison time if they don’t try saving the lives of infants born during attempted abortions has won approval in the Republican-controlled Senate. SENT: 130 words.

AROUND THE STATE & NATION:

BOEING-GROUNDED PLANES

DALLAS _ Boeing failed to win any orders for its 737 Max airliner in March as scrutiny of the plane increased following a second deadly crash in less than five months. Deliveries of finished Max jets also tumbled, to 11 from 26 in February. That was not surprising _ Boeing suspended deliveries in mid-March after regulators around the world ordered the plane grounded. Boeing’s report on orders and deliveries came just three days after the company announced that it will cut production of 737s from 52 a month to 42. Meanwhile, airlines that own the nearly 400 grounded Max jets are canceling flights. By Airlines Writer David Koenig. SENT: 530 words, photos. Moved on general and financial news services.

With:

_ ETHIOPIA-PLANE CRASH-LAWSUIT _ The family a Minnesota man who died when an Ethiopian Airlines plane crashed last month has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Boeing, the manufacturer of the 737 Max aircraft that was involved in the crash and is now being investigated by U.S. prosecutors. The suit was filed Monday in federal court in Chicago, where Boeing is based, on behalf of the family of Mucaad Hussein Abdalla, of St. Cloud. The lawsuit is the latest complaint in a growing number of claims against Boeing following two 737 Max crashes within six months. Nomaan Husain, one of two Houston lawyers representing Abdalla’s family, said the goal of the lawsuit is to obtain answers for his clients and “hold those accountable” for the crash that killed 157 people. SENT: 250 words. Moved on general and financial news services.

OBIT-LAST DOOLITTLE RAIDER

DALLAS _ Retired Lt. Col. Richard “Dick” Cole, the last of the 80 Doolittle Tokyo Raiders who carried out the daring U.S. attack on Japan during World War II, has died at a military hospital in Texas. He was 103. Robert Whetstone, a spokesman for Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, confirmed Cole’s death. Whetstone had no immediate additional details. Cole, who lived in Comfort, Texas, had stayed active even in recent years, attending air shows and participating in commemorative events including April 18, 2017, ceremonies for the raid’s 75th anniversary at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force near Dayton, Ohio. By Diana Heidgerd and Dan Sewell. SENT: 870 words, photos.

AIR BASE SHOOTING-2 DEAD-REPORT

SAN ANTONIO _ A 406-page report released by the US Air Force reveals there were several indications a former special forces soldier was mentally unstable years before he fatally shot a commanding officer in 2016 at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland before taking his own life. Warnings that Tech Sgt. Steven Bellino was mentally unstable, including his perception that individuals and commanders he worked with violated his sense of honor, had accumulated long before he came to Lackland. SENT: 520 words.

WHOOPING CRANES-SPY EGGS

NEW ORLEANS _ Spy eggs may help Louisiana biologists learn why some whooping crane chicks die in the egg, while others hatch. State wildlife biologists swap egg-shaped data loggers for one of the two eggs that many cranes lay. The real eggs come to Audubon Nature Institute, where they’re incubated until they’re nearly ready to hatch. Then biologists return the real eggs to their home nests and take back the fakes, which give up their data through an infrared connection. Biologist Sara Zimorski of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries says it will take several years to get enough data for any conclusions. By Janet McConnaughey. SENT: 700 words, photos, video.

IN BRIEF:

_ MEXICO-STUDENT SLAIN _The weekend killing of a female university student has sparked protests and a four-day shutdown at the University of Ciudad Juarez. SENT: 120 words.

_ BUMP STOCKS-DESTROYED-LAWSUIT _ A Texas gun company that destroyed more than 73,000 bump stocks when a federal ban on the rapid-fire devices took effect has sued the U.S. government claiming millions of dollars in losses. SENT: 130 words, photos, video. Moved on general and financial news services.

_ SCHOOL POLICE OFFICER-MARIJUANA _ A former South Texas police officer is going to prison for making fraudulent traffic stops to enable a crew to steal drug loads from traffickers for resale. SENT: 130 words.

_ NCAA CHAMPIONSHIP-RATINGS _ An average of 19.6 million people watched as Virginia beat Texas Tech in the NCAA Tournament championship game, an increase of 23% over last year. SENT: 160 words, photos. Moved on entertainment and sports news services.

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