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AP-IN--Indiana News Digest 1:30 pm, IN

September 17, 2018

Here’s a look at AP’s Indiana news coverage at 1:30 p.m. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Indianapolis bureau at 317-639-5501, 800-382-1582 or indy@ap.org. Ken Kusmer is on the desk, followed by Herbert McCann. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

All times ET.

A reminder: This information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Eastern. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

TOP STORY:

MIDTERMS-REPUBLICAN WARNINGS

WASHINGTON — The prognosis for President Donald Trump and his party was grim. In a post-Labor Day briefing at the White House, a top Republican pollster told senior staff that the determining factor in the election wouldn’t be the improving economy or the steady increase in job creation. It would be how voters feel about Trump. And the majority of the electorate, including a sizeable percentage of Republican-leaning voters, doesn’t feel good about the president, according to a presentation from pollster Neil Newhouse that spanned dozens of pages. Operatives in both parties say Republicans still have the edge in the fight for control of the Senate. But GOP officials are increasingly worried that nominees in conservative-leaning states like Missouri and Indiana are underperforming, while races in Tennessee and Texas that should be slam-dunks for Republicans are close. By Julie Pace, Catherine Lucey and Zeke Miller. SENT: 950 words, photo. Moving in national news queues.

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS:

HOLCOMB-TOLL ROAD

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana lawmakers say a proposed fee increase on heavy-duty commercial vehicles that use the Indiana Toll Road was negotiated without legislative involvement and with considerable secrecy. The Journal Gazette reports that the Indiana Toll Road Concession Company would give the state $1 billion over three years in exchange for the 35 percent toll increase. SENT: 130 words. UPCOMING: 250 words.

— KAREN PENCE-VISIT: Second Lady Karen Pence will be back home in Indiana this week to spotlight an opioid recovery program. SENT: 110 words.

AROUND THE STATE:

CLIMATE CHANGE-LAKE MICHIGAN

CHICAGO — A new report warns that warmer and wetter climate in the Midwest could lead to the displacement of some cold water fish species in southern Lake Michigan and trigger die-offs in smaller inland lakes. The Chicago Tribune reports that the Purdue University research published last week says the Great Lakes are warming along with the atmosphere due to the proliferation of greenhouse gases. SENT: 125 words. UPCOMING: 250 words.

IN BRIEF:

— CHILD SHOT-INDIANA: A northwestern Indiana woman has pleaded not guilty to neglect charges stemming from her 2-year-old daughter’s shooting death.

— CLEAN AIR-MARYLAND: Maryland’s attorney general says the state will appeal the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s decision to deny the state’s efforts to reduce emissions from 36 power plants in five upwind states.

— REDS-CUBS-HERO TEACHER: A suburban Indianapolis teacher who was shot in May while tackling a student who opened fire inside his classroom threw out the ceremonial first pitch at Wrigley Field before Sunday’s Chicago Cubs-Cincinnati Reds game.

— BODY CAMERAS-INDIANAPOLIS: The chief of police in Indianapolis says getting body cameras for his officers is a top goal.

— LOCAL HISTORY GRANTS: Federal grants totaling more than $476,000 have been awarded to 11 historic preservation and archaeology projects in Indiana communities.

— RIVER DEATH: Authorities have recovered the body of a 27-year-old man following a canoe accident in central Indiana.

SPORTS:

INDYCAR-SONOMA

SONOMA, Calif. — Scott Dixon was fully reclined, quietly watching NASCAR on television with friends, as the clock inched toward the IndyCar season finale. A fifth championship was one steady Sunday drive away and Dixon wasn’t the least bit stressed. Dixon needed only an uneventful Sunday at Sonoma Raceway to win the championship and sealed it by finishing second, the same place he started, behind Ryan Hunter-Reay. The fifth title moved him into second in IndyCar history, two behind A.J. Foyt. By Auto Racing Writer Jenna Fryer. SENT: 850 words, photos. Moved late Sunday and available for use.

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If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to indy@ap.org. If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867. For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477

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