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Beauty Scripts app allows pros to suggest products, earn money

January 9, 2019

When Greta Eagan’s clients asked for product recommendations or inquired about the brands she used in their appointment, the Jackson makeup artist always provided the information. Yet, almost inevitably, the list got lost in the chaos of the event.

Eagan wanted a way to digitize product recommendations and create a way beauty professionals and clients could easily find products.

That led to Beauty Scripts, an idea that won the Panelist Choice Award at Silicon Couloir’s Pitch Day competition for entrepreneurs in August, and that Eagan officially launches today.

Beauty professionals use the service to write beauty prescriptions — personalized product suggestions, with detailed directions on how the client should use them — and then send them to the client via email or text message.

The pros earn a commission on sales of products they “prescribe.”

The program targets beauty professionals who work as independent contractors and don’t have the inventory support of a salon or shop. It allows them to recommend any product they think will work best for the client, without having to worry about stocking and selling certain brands and allows clients to purchase products whenever they want.

“It deepens the trust between client and the beauty professional,” Eagan said. “It really lets the client know you have access to every product and you are choosing the exact right one for them.”

Eagan beta tested the program and already has 100 people signed up, including Jackson makeup artist Stephanie Broome.

“It changes the game completely,” Broome said.

Broome, a makeup artist for nine years, said she often wrote product names and directions on Post-It notes that got lost, or drew face charts showing what products and colors went where. Beauty Scripts makes it easier to give recommendations and directions, and it provides a way for the client to stay in touch with the artist after the appointment, she said.

“It’s just a great tool,” Broome said. “It makes our job a little easier.”

That’s Eagan’s goal, for professionals like Broome, but also for herself. Eagan has always loved beauty products. Her aunt, who owned a high-end salon in San Francisco, sent Eagan care packages when she was growing up in Jackson, and whenever she was at the grocery store she’d slip an Allure magazine in the cart.

Eagan went on to work at Pure, a now-closed makeup store in Jackson. She later did wedding makeup when home in the summers from the University of Colorado-Boulder, before she went to London for professional makeup training.

Eagan returned to Jackson and has worked as a makeup artist since 2014. She designed Beauty Scripts to be something she, as a beauty professional, would use.

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