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AM Prep-Cyber Corner

November 16, 2018

IN THE NEWS: ELECTRONIC DRIVER ASSIST SYSTEMS

DETROIT (AP) — You’ve probably seen the TV ads: a car with one of those fancy driver-assist systems heads down a street, the driver gets distracted for a moment — and the car stops in time to avoid an accident. A new study indicates that, like most TV ads, the ones touting such systems don’t tell the whole story. AAA tested the systems available today. And the agency says it found most may not keep a vehicle in its lane — or spot stationary objects— in time to avoid crashes. Greg Brannon of AAA says the driving systems are designed to help drivers — not to take over for the person at the wheel. He says some consumers may feel a false sense of security because many systems use the word “pilot” in their names. But Brannon says none of the systems on the road today are close to being an electronic “pilot” in the true sense of the word. That said, AAA notes despite their shortcomings, driver assist systems can save lives and stop crashes from happening.

IN THE NEWS: FACEBOOK RULES

NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook says it has stepped up its game when it comes to wiping out hate speech, graphic violence and other violations of its standards. The world’s largest social networking site says from April through September, it doubled the amount of hate speech detected, compared to the previous six-month period. Facebook says its filters were often able to flag offensive content before it got to users’ screens. The site has also disabled more than 1.5 billion fake accounts the last six-month period, compared to 1.3 billion the previous six-months. The Facebook report comes a day after The New York Times ran a report on how Facebook dealt with crises the past two years. The paper says Facebook’s strategy is “delay, deny and deflect.”

ON THE WEB: FAO SCHWARZ RETURNS

CYBERSPACE (AP) — Three years ago, FAO Schwarz closed its iconic toy store on New York’s Fifth Avenue. But now, the store is back, but in a different location. The new store opens today in Manhattan’s Rockefeller Center — about 10 blocks from its former outpost near Central Park. The store still has many of the extravagant playthings that made it a legend, including the huge piano keyboard Tom Hanks danced on in the 1988 movie “Big.” You can get a replica for $128. And while the store still has big-ticket items like a child-sized Mercedes Benz for $24,000, store officials say they also have items as low as $10.

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Online:

FAO Schwarz site: https://faoschwarz.com

by Oscar Wells Gabriel II

Follow Oscar Wells Gabriel II on Twitter at https://twitter.com/OWGabriel2

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