BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) _ Iraq and other Arab states on Tuesday expressed support of a United Nations call for a cease-fire in the Persian Gulf war, while Iran reiterated its rejection of the measure, calling it ''null and void.''

The Arab states stressed that the U.N. Security Council, which passed the resolution Monday, should be prepared to enforce the measure if it is to have any teeth.

Iraqi President Saddam Hussein met with his Revolutionary Command Council to study the resolution.

The official Iraqi News Agency quoted an unidentified spokesman as saying, ''our initial response to the resolution is positive, but the official position will be decided after the assembly's session.''

That was expected before the weekend.

Iraq has previously endorsed all Security Council resolutions calling for an end to the war. Iraq has made several peace approaches to Iran and agreed to mediation efforts. But Tehran has rebuffed all cease-fire calls.

Jordan, Iraq's closest ally in the war, welcomed the resolution and urged the international community to be ready to enforce it if either belligerent refuses to accept it.

''The unanimous adoption of the resolution is a landmark which will certainly help de-escalate war and tension in the Gulf,'' Jordanian Foreign Minister Taher al-Masri said.

The official Kuwaiti News Agency quoted Foreign Minister Sheik Sabah Al- Ahmed as saying: ''We will be much happier after both Iran and Iraq announce their readiness to implement the resolution ... (which) is in the absolute interest of the two Moslem neighbor countries and that of the region and the entire world.''

There was no official comment from the other Arab states of the gulf. But newspaper editorials in the state-guided media stressed the importance of implementing the resolution without delay.

''For the sake of international peace and stability in the region, the sooner this resolution is implemented, the better,'' said Abu Dhabi's Al- Ittihad daily.

''The real test for the Security Council will be its ability to impose international will and guarantee security and stability in the strategic Gulf region,'' echoed Qatar's Al-Ahd weekly.

Meanwhile, Iran's Foreign Ministry charged the United Nations had ignored ''Iraq's responsibility in resorting to force and starting the war'' in September 1980.

''For this reason the recent resolution will not have the slightest effect in inhibiting or reducing the scale of the imposed war,'' said the statement carried by Tehran radio and monitored in Cyprus.

Iran's official Islamic Republic News Agency, also monitored in Cyprus, said that U.S. intervention in the gulf was ''a blatant violation of the Council resolution, rendering it null and void.''

American warships will escort Kuwaiti tankers registered in the United States under the American flag to protect them from Iranian attack.

Iran has been attacking Kuwaiti vessels, charging the gulf emirate supports Iraq. Iran has threatened to attack the U.S. escorts as well.

In Lebanon, Iranian Revolutionary Guards and pro-Iranian Shiite Moslem radicals burned American and French flags and stoned effigies of the U.S. and French presidents in protests against the resolution.