OTTAWA (AP) _ Brett Lindros says brother Eric has been unfairly depicted as a villain because of his crushing hit on Andreas Dackell of the Ottawa Senators.

The younger Lindros, forced to retire from hockey by a series of concussions, defended his brother when he came to the Corel Centre to tape a feature for a TV show produced by the NHL Players' Association.

Eric Lindros' hit on Dackell last Thursday, for which the Philadelphia Flyers' star was not penalized, left the Ottawa winger with a concussion and facial cuts requiring 30 stitches.

Dackell has been sidelined ever since.

``I know what a concussion feels like, and Eric does, too,'' said Brett Lindros. ``But what are you going to do? Not finish your check?''

He said it bothered him when observers suggest his 6-foot-4, 236-pound brother was too big and hit too hard. He said Eric was trying to fight and hit less than he did in previous NHL seasons so that he could contribute more offensively.

``Nobody says anything about size when defensive linemen are chasing after (San Francisco 49ers quarterback) Steve Young,'' he said with a laugh.

``The game is bigger, faster, younger, and I don't think you'll ever hear a guy like (5-6, 180-pound Calgary Flames forward) Theoren Fleury complaining about being a small guy out there.''

As for the negative reception his brother might expect when the Flyers return to Ottawa on Jan. 18, he said it was unfortunate.

``He has always liked playing in this area of the country and he has always lit it up here,'' he said.