FRANKLIN, Tenn. (AP) _ When an astrologer wanted to set up shop at a weekend festival, one anonymous objector had the foresight to know the law.

She telephoned city officials and cited a little-known ordinance that prohibits such goings-on.

''I got a telephone call Monday from an anonymous woman who told me of the ordinance,'' City Recorder Marshall Liggett of this Nashville suburb said Tuesday. ''To be honest, I didn't know we had one prohibiting this kind of thing.''

The festival this weekend will go on as scheduled, but not with any activities banned by the 18-year-old ordinance, which reads:

''It shall be unlawful for any person to hold himself forth to the public as a fortune teller, clairvoyant, hypnotist, spiritualist, palmist, phrenologist, or other mystic endowed with supernatural powers.''

When Barbara Kurland, chairwoman of the festival, learned of the law she canceled the psychics.

The move was applauded by Alderwoman Margaret Butler, who said, ''This city does not want anything to do with psychics or witchcraft.

''It is evil and I am part of a large majority of God-fearing people who are against them, because they are against Christianity.''

But barber Dave Canida wasn't so sure.

''I suppose if anyone is dumb enough to pay those kinds of people money, they ought to be able to,'' he said.