Racketeering Defendant Admitted to FBI that She Worked for Order Retransmitting to fix category code

SEATTLE (AP) _ The only woman defendant in the racketeering case against The Order admitted to the FBI that she received stolen money from the Nazi-like group but denied involvement in major crimes, an agent testified.

However, Jean Craig told agents that group members determined Denver radio host Alan Berg should be killed ''because of his beliefs and statements,'' and that she operated a message center at the request of Order founder Robert Mathews, said FBI Agent David Keyes of Boise, Idaho.

The testimony Tuesday about Ms. Craig was expected to be followed today with additional evidence about the FBI rounding up Order members after Mathews died in a fiery shootout with agents Dec. 8, 1984, on Whidbey Island.

Ms. Craig, 52, made the admissions in a statement she gave Keyes and another agent Jan. 12, about a month later.

She is the only woman among 10 defendants on trial in U.S. District Court, and is accused of receiving money other Order members stole July 19, 1984, in a $3.6 million armored car robbery, and of watching Berg's movements and habits before a four-man Order hit squad shot him to death on June 18.

The defendants and 13 other indicted on racketeering charges are accused of two murders, more than $4 million in robberies, and other crimes as they waged an Aryan crusade against Jews, racial minorities and the government.

Ms. Craig told the agents about her involvement with the white supremacist group after she asked to meet with them, Keyes said.

She said she met Mathews in September 1983 in Laramie, Wyo., through her daughter, Zillah, Keyes said. Mathews, who was married, also had Zillah Craig as a girlfriend, and the two had a baby together on Oct. 3, 1984.

Ms. Craig said she and Mathews discussed his philosophy, and ''she decided she wanted to help Mr. Mathews and his Order,'' Keyes said.

In May 1984, at Mathews' request, Ms. Craig dropped out of the University of Wyoming and moved to Boise, he said. There, she operated a message center, which Order members would call to leave messages for each other.

She admitted receiving $10,000 in robbery proceeds from Mathews, but denied she played any role in the Berg killing or robberies, Keyes said. ''She told us The Order had wanted to kill Mr. Berg because of his beliefs and statements.''

Berg, a Jew, used his show as a platform for caustic verbal attacks on right-wing extremists.