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AP-IN--Indiana News Digest 1:30 pm, IN

August 22, 2018

Here’s a look at AP’s Indiana news coverage at 1:30 p.m. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Indianapolis bureau at 317-639-5501, 800-382-1582 or indy@ap.org. Ken Kusmer is on the desk, followed by Herbert McCann. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

All times ET.

A reminder: This information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Eastern. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

TOP STORY:

KANKAKEE RIVER-BOYS DIE

SCHNEIDER, Ind. — The father of two Indiana boys who died after being pulled from a river was acting strangely before his sons were found in the waterway and could face charges in their deaths, a sheriff said Wednesday. Four-year-old Levi Patillo and 2-year-old Evan Patillo died Tuesday after witnesses pulled them unresponsive from the Kankakee River in southern Lake County near the Illinois state line. SENT: 130 words. UPCOMING: 280 words.

AROUND THE STATE:

PEOPLE-ADAM DRIVER-KKK COMMENTS

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — A museum official who questioned “Star Wars” actor Adam Driver’s recent comments about remembering frequent Ku Klux Klan rallies during his youth in northern Indiana says he stands corrected. Driver made the comments during a USA Today interview about his role in the new movie “BlacKkKlansman.” A Monday story by the Indianapolis Star quoted Travis Childs of The History Museum in South Bend saying the actor was likely misremembering his childhood in Mishawaka. SENT: 130 words. UPCOMING: 250 words.

IN BRIEF:

— INFANT-ATTEMPTED POISONING — An Indiana man has been charged with conspiring with his girlfriend to try to poison her infant niece by adding crushed painkillers to a bottle of breast milk.

— SIBLINGS CHARGED: A man who pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter in the fatal beating of his sister’s boyfriend during an argument at a southwestern Indiana motel has been sentenced to prison.

— GARY-PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING: The Gary City Council has voted to explore the option of selling and leasing back its public safety building in an effort to raise funds to balance the city’s budget.

— MANURE SPILL-FISH KILL: Officials are investigating a northwestern Indiana manure spill that’s believed to have killed thousands of fish.

— PRIEST ATTACKED-HATE CRIME: Police in northwest Indiana say an attack on a Catholic priest has been forwarded to the FBI as a possible hate crime because the assailant referred to reports of clergy sex abuse involving children.

— CATHOLIC SCHOOL-COUNSELOR: The Indianapolis archbishop has addressed the controversy over a Catholic high school guidance counselor suspended after her same-sex marriage became known, saying she’s a minister of the church called to share in its mission.

SPORTS:

FBN--COLTS-ANNOUNCER RETIRES

INDIANAPOLIS — Longtime announcer Bob Lamey announced his retirement as the voice of the Indianapolis Colts on Saturday after using a racial slur while retelling a story last week to a “friend.” Lamey’s attorney released a statement Wednesday morning acknowledging Lamey used “inappropriate” language during an off-the-air conversation last week and immediately apologized to those involved. A team official later issued a statement that said in part the Colts “deplore and do not tolerate the use of any racial slur — in any context.” By Michael Marot. SENT: 130 words. UPCOMING: 600 words.

FBC--HOW TO MAKE A SCHEDULE

Ask athletic directors what they are trying to accomplish when they build a nonconference football schedule and the objectives are mostly the same: Come up with a slate of games that allows the school to meet its competitive and financial goals. What are those goals? The answers vary widely. There is no national standardization in college football scheduling, which means there have been debates, complaints and ridicule for as long as marching bands have been performing at halftime. By College Football Writer Ralph D. Russo. SENT: 1,785 words, photo.

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If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to indy@ap.org. If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867. For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477.

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