Good morning! Here's a look at how AP's news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to:

The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org

The South Carolina AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau at 334-262-5947 or apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau at 504-523-3931 or nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau at 601-948-5897 or jkme@ap.org

For up-to-the minute information on AP's coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Deep South Editor Jim Van Anglen can be reached at 1-800-821-3737 or jvananglen@ap.org. Administrative Correspondent Rebecca Santana can be reached at 504-523-3931 or rsantana@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

GEORGIA (All times Eastern):

IN BRIEF:

— SHERIFF'S DEPUTY-SOLICITING SEX — A county sheriff's deputy has been arrested and fired for allegedly soliciting sex from a woman he arrested.

— DAIRY PLANT CLOSING — A Mayfield Dairy plant in a Georgia city is set to close and lay off more than 100 employees.

SOUTH CAROLINA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

SUPREME COURT-KAVANAUGH-CIVIL RIGHTS

WASHINGTON — Brett Kavanaugh emailed his White House colleagues in June 2003 with an alert: The U.S. Supreme Court was about to release opinions on the University of Michigan's use of race as a factor to admit students. It was an issue of great interest to his boss, President George W. Bush — who favored race-neutral admissions — and one Kavanaugh had followed for years. Staff prepared a response anticipating the practice would be struck down, saying, "We must be ever mindful not to use means that create another wrong and thus perpetuate our divisions" in the pursuit of diversity. By Jesse J. Holland and Tammy Webber. SENT: 1,082 words, photos. EDITOR'S NOTE — One in a series of stories examining the nomination of federal appeals court Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court

IN BRIEF:

— UNITED AIRLINES-COLLEGE FOOTBALL — United Airlines says it's adding more flights and using bigger planes this fall to carry passengers to college football games across the South and elsewhere in the U.S.

ALABAMA (All Times Central)

TOP STORIES:

HIGH SCHOOL-DIXIE

ARAB, Ala. — The fight over Confederate symbolism has landed in an Alabama town where education leaders have banned the high school marching band from playing "Dixie" as the fight song. Opponents of the decision packed a city school board meeting Thursday night in support of the song, which they depict as a traditional part of the soundtrack of life in their small, Southern town rather than an ode to the days of slavery in the Old South. In Mississippi, the University of Mississippi's "Pride of the South" marching band excluded the song from its playlist in 2016, and the Marching Rebels band of Robert E. Lee High School in Midland, Texas, quit playing "Dixie" last year. By Jay Reeves. UPCOMING: 800 words, photos.

IN BRIEF:

— UNITED AIRLINES-COLLEGE FOOTBALL — United Airlines says it's adding more flights and using bigger planes this fall to carry passengers to college football games across the South and elsewhere in the U.S.

— CEMETERY THEFTS — Three Alabama men are accused of stealing around 100 bronze vases from graves and selling them as scrap metal.

— ELECTRICAL WORKER KILLED — Authorities say an electrical worker from Alabama has died in Tennessee.

LOUISIANA (All Times Central)

TOP STORIES:

TARIFFS-PORTS

Ports and ground terminals in nearly every state handle goods that are now or will likely soon be covered by import tariffs. Port executives worry that this could mean a slowdown in shipping that would have ripple effects on truckers and others whose jobs depend on trade. The Associated Press analyzed government data and found that from the West Coast to the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico, at least 10 percent of imports at many ports could face new tariffs if President Donald Trump's proposals take full effect. By David Koenig. SENT: 1,284 words, photos. EDITOR'S NOTE: Moved in a previous cycle. Resending to online points. The AP has distributed shipping district and port-level data from over 250 ports to help members localize this story. If your news organization has a license to receive AP's data distributions, go to https://data.world/associatedpress/trump-tariffs To enroll in AP's data distribution program, email APDigitalSales@ap.org

IN BRIEF:

— LOUISIANA ROAD MONEY — Louisiana is getting $80 million in redistributed federal highway funds that weren't spent by other states.

— RED DRUM SEASON — The commercial fishing season for Red Drum will open at 12:01 a.m. Saturday. Officials with the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources say in a release that the annual total allowable catch for commercial Red Drum is 60,000 pounds.

MISSISSIPPI (All Times Central)

TOP STORIES:

HIGH SCHOOL-DIXIE

ARAB, Ala. — The fight over Confederate symbolism has landed in an Alabama town where education leaders have banned the high school marching band from playing "Dixie" as the fight song. Opponents of the decision packed a city school board meeting Thursday night in support of the song, which they depict as a traditional part of the soundtrack of life in their small, Southern town rather than an ode to the days of slavery in the Old South. In Mississippi, the University of Mississippi's "Pride of the South" marching band excluded the song from its playlist in 2016, and the Marching Rebels band of Robert E. Lee High School in Midland, Texas, quit playing "Dixie" last year. By Jay Reeves. UPCOMING: 800 words, photos.

IN BRIEF:

— ALLIGATOR HUNTING — Mississippi's alligator hunting season opens at noon Friday for 10 days.

— FATAL SHOOTING-FATHER-SON — A Mississippi man is accused of shooting his 20-year-old son to death.

— RED DRUM SEASON — The commercial fishing season for Red Drum will open at 12:01 a.m. Saturday. Officials with the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources say in a release that the annual total allowable catch for commercial Red Drum is 60,000 pounds.

___

If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to

The Atlanta AP Bureau: apatlanta@ap.org

The South Carolina AP Bureau: apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau: apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau: nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau: jkme@ap.org

If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867. For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477.