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Bon Appetit! Thanksgiving dinner may cost less this year

November 19, 2018
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The American Farm Bureau Federation's 33rd annual survey of classic items found that the average cost of this year's Thanksgiving Day feast for 10 people is $48.90, or less than $5 per person.

HUNTINGTON — On Thursday, many families will put out an elaborate display of food on the dining room table to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday by sharing a meal surrounded by those they love most, and according to a recent study, the cost of Thanksgiving dinner has decreased slightly from a year ago.

“Since 2015, the average cost of Thanksgiving dinner has declined steadily and is now at the lowest level since 2010,” American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) chief economist John Newton said in a news release.

The lower cost is related to the feature item on most dinner tables — the turkey. Due to what AFBF said is an “ample supply of turkey this year,” the average cost of the treasured fowl is approximately $1.36 per pound, about a 3 percent decrease from last year and the lowest cost for turkey since 2014. Competitive pricing between grocery stores also tends to decrease the cost of turkey, according to the study.

According to the AFBF’s 33rd annual survey of classic items found on the Thanksgiving Day dinner table, the average cost of this year’s feast for 10 people is $48.90, or less than $5 per person. This is a 22-cent decrease from last year’s average of $49.12 and the third consecutive year the overall average price has decreased.

The shopping list for Farm Bureau’s informal survey includes turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, rolls with butter, peas, cranberries,

a veggie tray, pumpkin pie with whipped cream, and coffee and milk, all in quantities sufficient to serve a family of 10 with plenty for leftovers.

Preparations for the annual Thanksgiving feast are made well in advance, but if you haven’t had time to hit the grocery stores yet, you can still find good deals offered by companies in the region.

President of Forth Foods Inc. and FoodFair Supermarkets Tim Forth said his stores are offering “can’t-miss” deals on some of the most common holiday food items.

“We’ve got anything from frozen and fresh pies to vegetables and meat on sale here in the store,” Forth said. “Anything you might find on the table at Thanksgiving, you can probably find on sale.”

FoodFair is running a $1.19 per-pound special on Butterball turkeys through Thursday, identical to the sale they ran last year. FoodFair is open from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day.

Kroger is running mealdeal specials for Thanksgiving starting at $59.99 for a medium-sized dinner while supplies last. Included in the price is a 10-to 12-pound turkey or ham with an 8-inch pumpkin pie, 12 dinner rolls and two sides. Large dinners are available for $79.99 and include a 13-to 16-pound turkey with a pie, 12 rolls and four sides, with the option of turkey or prime rib dinner. While many Kroger stores are open 24 hours, select stores will only be open from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day.

Walmart has introduced fully cooked and microwaveable ham or turkey dinners for $47.88 before tax. The deal includes the meat only and is large enough to serve 6-8 people.

If you’re looking to add some local f lavor to your Thanksgiving dinner, The Wild Ramp in Huntington is an option. Inventory is stocked entirely from within a 250-mile radius of Huntington and is running wild with an array of root vegetables, including potatoes, ginger, radishes and parsnips. Wild Ramp market manager Kelsey Abad said they also keep a selection of cheeses, seasonal items such as pumpkin, and fresh meat for the holidays.

“All of our meats are going to be so much more fresh than big-box stores because our products go from the farm to the butcher, straight to us,” Abad said. “By cutting out two or three of the middlemen in the process, we can offer a much higher quality product.”

Though it is too late to get a fresh turkey from The Wild Ramp since they are brought in by special order, last-minute shoppers can still find a selection of fresh meats in the market, from high-end, grassfed beef and pork to venison sausages and lamb meat.

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