IN THE NEW: FACEBOOK-INVESTIGATION

MENLO PARK, Calif. (AP) — Facebook says it has removed more than 650 pages groups and accounts linked to Russia and Iran ahead of the midterm elections in the United States.

The social network said it found no links between the activity that originated in Iran and that which it sourced to Russia.

But it said the two used similar tactics by creating networks of accounts to mislead others about who they were and what they were doing.

IN THE NEWS: MICROSOFT-INTERNET COP

REDMON, Wash. (AP) — Intentionally or not, Microsoft has emerged as a kind of internet cop by devoting considerable resources to thwarting Russian hackers.

The company's announcement Tuesday that it had identified and forced the removal of fake internet domains mimicking conservative U.S. political institutions triggered alarm on Capitol Hill and led Russian officials to accuse the company of participating in an anti-Russian "witch hunt."

Microsoft stands virtually alone among tech companies with an aggressive approach that uses U.S. courts to fight computer fraud and seize hacked websites back. In the process, it has acted more like a government detective than a global software giant.

In the case this week, the company did not just accidentally stumble onto a couple of harmless spoof websites. It seized the latest beachhead in an ongoing struggle against Russian hackers who meddled in the 2016 presidential election. The Redmond, Washington, company sued the hacking group best known as Fancy Bear in August 2016, saying it was breaking into Microsoft accounts and computer

ON THE WEB: 3D GUN-LAWSUIT

CYBERSPACE (AP) — A federal judge hearing arguments over a settlement that allows a company to post online plans for printing 3D guns said the overall issue of such untraceable plastic weapons should be decided by the president or Congress.

U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik said Tuesday that he'll rule on the legal issues involving the settlement between the company and the Trump administration. He added, however, that "a solution to the greater problem is so much better suited" to the president or Congress.

Lasnik previously issued a restraining order blocking the online release of the plans. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia want the judge to make it permanent.

Washington state Assistant Attorney General Jeff Rupert argued that the government's decision to allow Texas-based Defense Distributed to post the 3D gun plans threatens public safety and should be reversed.