Undated (AP) _ Soviet-built Ilyushin-62 aircraft like the one that crashed shortly after takeoff from Okecie Airport in Warsaw today are widely used by state- owned airlines in Communist nations.

Jane's All the World's Aircraft, an authoritative reference, describes the plane in its 1986-87 edition as a four-jet, long-range airliner. The engines are set near the rear of the plane, similar to the British-made VC-10.

The first prototype flew in 1963 and the Soviet state airline Aeroflot introduced the Il-62 on its Moscow-Montreal route Sept. 15, 1967. Production is reported to have totaled more than 200 of various configurations.

Current operators of the aircraft besides Poland's LOT include the U.S.S.R.'s Aeroflot, China's CAAC, Choson Minhang of North Korea, Czechoslovak Airlines, Cubana, Interflug of East Germany and Tarom of Romania.

The aircraft normally has a crew of five - two pilots, navigator, radio operator and flight engineer - with provisions for two other pilot-navigators.

The aircraft has a wingspan of 141 feet, 9 inches and is 173 feet, 3 1/2 inches long. It stands 40 feet, 6 1/4 inches high with a fuselage width of 12 feet, 3 1/2 inches.

The plane's cabin can be configured for up to 186 passengers, although there is a de luxe model that seats only 85.

Normal cruising speed is 509-560 mph and normal cruising altitude is 33,000 to 39,400 feet. Its range is up to 6,215 miles.