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BC-KY--Kentucky News Digest 2 pm, KY

May 26, 2019

Here’s a look at how AP’s general news coverage is shaping up in Kentucky. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Louisville bureau at (502) 583-7718 or aplouisville(at)ap.org. News editor Scott Stroud can be reached at sstroud@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. If circumstances change before 6 p.m., a new digest will be sent reflecting those developments. All times are Eastern.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Top Stories:

VAPING-SCHOOLS

HARTFORD, Conn. _ A glimpse of student athletes in peak physical condition vaping just moments after competing in a football game led Stamford High School Principal Raymond Manka to reconsider his approach to the epidemic. His school traditionally has emphasized discipline for those caught with e-cigarettes. Punishments become increasingly severe with each offense, from in-school suspensions to out-of-school suspensions and, eventually, notification of law enforcement. By Pat Eaton-Robb.

AP Photos.

SECOND CHANCE ACT

RALEIGH, N.C. _ Every time 28-year-old Poet Williams applies for a job, his arrest record comes up: three nonviolent misdemeanors. Those drug charges have followed the Durham resident since he was 21, barring him from jobs, apartments and opportunities. By Amanda Morris.

AP Photos.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING PROSECUTIONS

BOSTON _ Laws cracking down on human trafficking are on the books in all 50 states, but convictions are notoriously elusive, and state prosecutors haven’t come close to matching the success their federal counterparts have had in winning cases. States need to add resources into support trafficking victims, educate the public and train law enforcement if the numbers of prosecutions and convictions are to improve, officials and experts say. In at least a dozen states, attorneys general are not even authorized to pursue human trafficking charges. By Philip Marcelo.

AP Photos .

Also:

EXCHANGE-NEW TECH GRADS

OWENSBORO, Ky. _ Kentucky Commissioner of Education Wayne Lewis told the first graduating class of the Owensboro Innovation Academy that he was proud to stand before the 59 students who blazed the trail to become the first New Tech high school in Kentucky. Lewis was the commencement speaker for the graduation this month that took place at the RiverPark Center. It was the first graduation of the school that began four years ago. The OIA is a part of the New Tech Network, a 19-year-old network based in Napa, California, with 207 schools in 25 states and Australia. It was the first in Kentucky to be selected as part of the network. The project-based learning school comprises students from the Owensboro Public Schools and Daviess County Public Schools districts, as well as students from Hancock County. An AP Member Exchange.

AP Photo.

In Brief:

FATAL CRASH, from BONNIEVILLE, Ky. _ Kentucky State Police say a man and two children from North Carolina have died in a crash on Interstate 65.

MISSING BOY, from EMINENCE, Ky. _ Kentucky State Police say the body of a 7-year-old boy has been found in a pond near his home.

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