JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The Latest on a special session of the Mississippi Legislature (all times local):

8:22 p.m.

The Mississippi Senate has passed a bill that would create a state lottery.

Working late Monday, 31 senators voted for the bill and 17 voted against it.

The vote came shortly after the House killed the same bill, with 60 voting against the bill and 54 voting for it. The vote was initially announced as 61 opposed and 53 in favor, but one representative went from no to yes.

The issue is of a lottery is not dead. The House held the bill for the possibility of more debate. That gives supporters a chance to revive it and send it to Republican Gov. Phil Bryant, who supports creating a lottery to generate money for highways and bridges.

Mississippi is one of six states without a lottery.

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8 p.m.

The Mississippi House has killed a bill that would create a state lottery, voting 61-53 against it.

But, the bill was held for the possibility of more debate. That means supporters could try to revive it.

The House and Senate are both working late Monday at the state Capitol. They are in the third day of a special session, trying to find ways to put about $200 million a year into highways and bridges.

Top lawmakers estimated that a lottery could generate about $40 million the first year it is in operation and $80 million in subsequent years. Mississippi is currently one of six states without a lottery.

The House and Senate agreed earlier Monday on a transportation funding plan that would give cities and counties some of the sales tax money the state collects from people shopping online. The bill goes to Republican Gov. Phil Bryant, who indicates he will sign it. It is projected to eventually provide $120 million to $130 million a year for infrastructure

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10:46 a.m.

Mississippi lawmakers are back at the Capitol for the third day of a special session.

They are considering ways to put about $200 million a year into highways and bridges.

The House and Senate passed different versions two bills last week. One would create a state lottery. The other would give cities and counties a portion of sales tax revenue that the state collects from online purchases.

Legislators are also expected to consider how to spend $700 million in economic damage payments from BP PLC after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Leaders are discussing dividing that money, giving 75 percent to the three coastal counties and 25 percent to the rest of the state.