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BC-GA--Georgia Weekend Items, ADVISORY, GA

January 4, 2019

Editors:

Here’s a list of Georgia stories expected to move so far for this weekend - Jan. 5 to Jan. 6.

Moving Saturday

MILITARY BASES-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

ATLANTA _ There are fears that groundwater near Georgia military bases could remain contaminated from a toxic firefighting foam used for decades by the U.S. Air Force. Recent tests at Georgia’s three air bases show extensive environmental contamination of groundwater. The Air Force has said Georgia’s drinking water is safe for the thousands of people living around its installations. But experts and nearby residents question those findings, saying the military’s review was too narrow.

Information from The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. UPCOMING: 500 words.

Moving Sunday

GEORGIA STUDENTS-DYSLEXIA

ATLANTA _ A state Senate committee is recommending that Georgia take steps to help students who have dyslexia. The committee recently submitted its final report to the Legislature. Starting in August, the committee heard testimony from parents of children with dyslexia, teachers who work with dyslexic students and education experts.

Information from WABE Radio. UPCOMING: 350 words.

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Moving Saturday

EXCHANGE-NEW YEAR’S-MATERNITY NURSES

MACON, Ga. _ At 6:50 p.m. on a Monday, Stephanie Matheney swipes her nurse’s badge at the clock-in station and prepares for a long night ahead. The labor and delivery nurse expects her 12-hour overnight shift at the Family Ties Birthing Center at the Coliseum Medical Centers to be just like any other: unpredictable. No expecting mothers have scheduled an induction, and Matheney doesn’t know if she’ll have the chance to help deliver a baby before she leaves in the morning.

By Samantha Max. The Macon Telegraph.

Moving Sunday

EXCHANGE-DISCOVERING THEY’RE SISTERS

ATLANTA _ For nearly three decades, Janine Dzyubanny thought she knew her life story. She could easily recount the information in the adoption file her parents allowed her to read at age 16. Abandoned on the streets of South Korea as a baby, she had been taken in by an orphanage in Seoul and quickly adopted by her family in New Jersey.

By Nedra Rhone. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

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