AP NEWS

Longs Peak Disc Golf Club Finds New Home for Winter Indoor League

January 9, 2019
Maui Shipkey warms up before a Longs Peak Disc Golf Club indoor putting league meet Tuesday at the Dickens Opera House. The venue opened its doors to the club for this season.

For most, disc golf is a fun way to spend a day messing around with your friends in the summer, but not for the 200 some members of the Longs Peak Disc Golf Club in Longmont. For them, it’s a way of life.

“We’re not just a bunch of stoners throwing a Frisbee around,” said club president Brett Rosso, who daylights as a GIS analyst for the City of Longmont. “We’re serious about this.”

They’re so serious, in fact, that they are continuing to host a winter indoor putting league.

Though it took some time to find a venue willing to host an indoor Frisbee golf league once a week for this season, they refused to give up.

In 2016 the club thought Oskar Blues would host it, but that quickly fell through when a new manager came in. Last year the club hosted the league in Dizzy’s Family Fun Center, but that establishment recently announced it would be going out of business.

For a while it looked as though they had run out of options.

“I can’t tell you how many places I called,” Rosso said. “Hotels, bowling alleys, the indoor soccer field, the recreation center, anywhere that had convention space, but then it hit me. What about Dickens?”

For now, it appears the club has finally found a suitable home in the Dickens Opera Houseon Tuesday nights from 6:30 p.m. to around 10 p.m. Entry is $10 a week and open to the public.

“We weren’t doing anything with this space before so it just made sense,” said Aaron Whalen , a bartender at Dickens who gave up his night off just to be able to work during the league. “I’ve been a bartender for 10 years and this easily one of my top three favorite groups that come in. It’s great for business, especially on a Tuesday, and its just good group of people.”

During the league’s opening night this year, over 60 people attended the indoor putting league. Some of them come from as far as Fort Collins and Denver.

Though there’s not enough space for a full course, two “holes” are set up on the stage. Rosso then sets up five different stations around the floor where participants have to make different kinds of throws from. Those with the lowest scores in each division — amateur, women, and pro — take home a cash prize ranging from $50 to $80 depending on how many people compete that night.

The cash prize, however, is even a consideration for most. It’s the camaraderie that mainly drives attendance.

“It’s a great way to practice and keep that muscle memory up, but really it’s just a chance for all of us to get together,” Jimmie Solis, a 40-year-old landscaper, said. “This is like a second family to us. I met pretty much all of my friends through the club here and the support you get is amazing.”

Just last year Solis hit some hard times financially and within a couple months the club had organized a charity tournament that raised $2,600 to help him and his family out.

The club hopes these somewhat casual indoor putting leagues will help to grow that family along with the sport.

“As a club, we’re just trying to grow the sport and get more people into it,” Rosso said. “This is just another thing to keep people going throughout the year because this is a summer sport.”

During the summer the Longs Peak Disc Golf Club hosts a 16-week league played on three different courses in Longmont and Mead that draws over 120 attendees, as well as a national tournament in October that brings in professional disc golfers from around the country.

“People in the disc golf community are really passionate,” Rosso said. “Anytime we put on an event the whole club comes out. It’s getting big, in a few years you’ll start to see it on ESPN.”

John Spina: 303-473-1389, jspina@times-call.com or twitter.com/jsspina24

AP RADIO
Update hourly