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New Show Based In Lackawanna County Investigates UFOs

January 2, 2019
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New Show Based In Lackawanna County Investigates UFOs

ARCHBALD — The search for aliens started in their barber shop.

Now, three Lackawanna County barbers are wrapping up the pilot for their new show, UFBROS, where, according to the group’s slogan, they “search space for the old ones, while cracking a case of the cold ones.”

Shane Butler of Carbondale, Frank Froese of Peckville and Brian “Toxic” Evans of Scranton work together at Loyalty Barber Shop, Archbald, where the trio’s conversations about UFOs and aliens, among themselves and with customers, brought them in front of the camera.

The idea to pursue a show cemented itself in the winter of 2017 when they started making their plans for a pilot, which they started filming earlier this year.

“We would meet up and get drinks and talk about it anyway,” Butler said. “So, why not try to make a pilot and see if it goes anywhere?”

They’ve taken their interest in “ufology,” the study of UFOs, and their cases of Corona Premiers across the state, conducting on-camera interviews in Pittsburgh, Pottsville and Kecksburg. So far, the trio has interviewed five people on camera for their project.

One of these people is Maria Gillette, who, for the first time, agreed to go on camera to discuss an incident in Carbondale 44 years ago.

On Nov. 9, 1974, then-teenager Robert Gillette Jr. and two friends reported to police that they saw a red, whirring ball fly over Salem Mountain and followed it to a silt pond in Carbondale.

In 1999, Robert Gillette told The Times-Tribune that he threw a battery-powered, sealed-beam lantern into the water to scare his sister, Maria.

However, while cutting hair and discussing the project, Butler brought up both the incident and the late Gillette. Little did he know, Gillette’s nephew was in the shop getting his hair cut. He put the UFBROS in touch with Maria, who still lives in Carbondale and agreed to an interview about the incident.

“She took it as a sign to interview with us, to put it to rest for her brother, since (Robert) passed away,” Butler said.

In the UFBROS trailer on YouTube, Maria Gillette said her brother was told there would be more than a UFO in the pond if he or the other teens opened their mouths about what happened back in 1974.

With popular television shows like the History Channel’s “Ancient Aliens” finishing its 13th season, the phenomena of UFOs and extraterrestrial life continues to spark the imaginations of people everywhere.

However, despite millions of claims, confirming the legitimacy of UFO sightings is a nearly impossible task, according to Peter Davenport, director of the National UFO Reporting Center.

“There are millions and millions of UFO sightings,” he said. “It’s almost impossible to answer because it presupposes that we can positively, absolutely identify or determine whether a report is legitimate or not.”

People interested in the work being done by the UFBROS can find them at UFBROS.tv on Instagram and UF BROS on Facebook. They anticipate their 15- to 20-minute pilot, filmed by Stephen Reuther of Reuther Productions, to premiere on YouTube and Facebook in early 2019.

As for the future, Butler said he would like to combine education with entertainment. And, collectively, the UFBROS hope they can continue researching, filming and making future episodes to learn along with viewers. Most importantly, their mission is to learn about UFOs, keep an open mind, never take themselves too seriously and encourage people to study the skies.

“Nobody looks up any more,” Froese said. “We’ve got to get people looking up again.”

Contact the writer:

drosler@timesshamrock.com

570-348-9100, x. 5365; @droslerTT

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