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Paper: D.C. Police Chief May Resign

November 25, 1997

WASHINGTON (AP) _ Embattled District of Columbia police chief Larry D. Soulsby is considering resigning following reports that he and a police lieutenant leased a luxury apartment for less than its market rate, according to a published report.

``I am considering whether or not my departure from the police department would refocus the attention on crime-fighting efforts,″ Soulsby was quoted in Tuesday’s editions of The Washington Post.

Soulsby said that he plans to discuss the possibility of his resignation at a meeting Tuesday with Stephen Harlan, the member of the city’s congressionally appointed financial control board who oversees the police department.

The chief confirmed broadcast reports that he and Lt. Jeffrey Stowe have been splitting $650-a-month in rent for an apartment in a luxury building about three blocks from police headquarters in downtown Washington.

That is about one-third the average rent for such an apartment, and the broadcast reports said that Soulsby and Stowe were able to get a discount because they told the landlord that the apartment was to be used for police surveillance operations.

``If Chief Soulsby determines that his role is detrimental to the success of the department, then it’s his call (whether) to resign,″ Harlan said.

Stowe, the former head of the department’s Special Investigations Unit, is on administrative leave with pay and is under investigation by the FBI for allegedly misappropriating department funds and attempted extortion.

Soulsby said he gave federal agents permission to search Stowe’s room as they continue to pursue their investigation.

The chief came under fire last month when a report by the consulting firm of Booz-Allen and Hamilton said the agency is plagued by mismanagement, wasteful spending, misplaced evidence and has an unguarded property warehouse that is vulnerable to thefts.

The report also said that officers who could be deployed against street crime are often assigned to low-level duties.

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