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The Latest: Voting machine problems in Madison County

November 7, 2018
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Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey speaks at Montgomery Airport before flying around the state on the final full day of her campaign in Montgomery, Ala., on Monday, Nov. 5, 2018. (Jake Crandall/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The Latest on Tuesday’s election results in Alabama (all times local):

8:25 p.m.

Election officials blamed damp weather for problems with voting machines in Madison County.

Madison County Probate Judge Tommy Ragland said humidity caused paper ballots to swell and some machines had difficulty reading the marked ballots.

Ragland said polls workers will try again after polls close at 7 p.m. Ragland told The Associated Press Tuesday afternoon that problems had been reported at least two polling places, but he did not know how widespread the problem is.

Ragland said he was uncertain if ballots would need to be hand-counted.

Secretary of State John Merrill said he didn’t think it will cause difficulty. Merrill said he thought the ballots could be read by machine after they dried.

Two polling places in Montgomery County were staying open an hour later after problems there.

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Republican Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey, who was catapulted to the governor’s office last year by scandal, is seeking to win the post in her own right and fend off a robust Democratic challenge from Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox.

Ivey became governor last year when then-Gov. Robert Bentley resigned in the middle of an impeachment push.

Ivey told voters throughout the campaign that she had restored trust to government and emphasized the state’s record low unemployment and growing economy.

Maddox ran on a campaign of establishing a state lottery and Medicaid expansion. He has waged an aggressive push for the office that has not been won by a Democrat since 1998.

Maddox pitched the race as a choice between politicians who are content with the state’s low rankings in education, health care and other indicators and those who think it could be better.

Polls open at 7 a.m.

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