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Tips for planning a spring break trip

January 6, 2019

The warm glow from a family vacation lasts long after you’ve returned home. With spring break just around the corner, here are some tips for planning a fun and memorable getaway with the kids.

First, decide what type of vacation you want to take. You’ll have a lot of company if you’re traveling during a school vacation week, so start planning early and take advantage of the expertise provided by a travel advisor.

For example, if you’re thinking about Disney World, let your travel advisor book your stay at a Disney resort. It’ll give your family perks like the ability to get earlier access to the most popular rides.

If a cruise is on your vacation bucket list, your travel advisor can help you decide which excursions to go on as a family, and which ones you may want to skip, so that you can enjoy the ship at a time when there are fewer people onboard.

Mexico and the Caribbean have excellent choices for all-inclusive resorts that offer amenities for the whole family, from kids’ clubs and waterparks to spas for the adults.

Your travel advisor can help you explore all the options.

Once you’ve booked your trip, it’s time to get down to packing.

If you’re flying to your vacation, space in overhead bins is likely to be at a premium.

Make sure that your luggage meets the airline’s size and weight restrictions for both carry-ons and checked baggage.

Make color photocopies and digital copies of important travel documents, including your passport, the front and back of credit cards and health insurance information for you and your children.

If you’re traveling internationally, bring a copy of your children’s immunization records. For safekeeping, pack all copies in a separate location from your identification.

The Transportation Security Administration allows each passenger one quart-sized bag of liquids and gels that are 3.4 ounces or smaller. But medications and certain items for children are an exception to the 3-ounce rule.

Infant formula, breast milk and juices for infants and toddlers, as well as ice packs to keep them cool, are allowed through airport security checkpoints in higher, yet reasonable quantities. Just make sure you keep them separate from the items in your one-quart bag.

When traveling with young children, make sure they’re wearing comfortable clothing. If your child is young enough, consider giving him or her a ride to the security checkpoint and gate in a stroller. It’ll help keep them in tow and keep your stress level low.

Children age 12 and under never have to remove their shoes or lightweight jackets at airport security, and they don’t need their own TSA Precheck boarding pass.

They can go through the TSA Precheck with any qualified adult with whom they are traveling.

If you’re traveling outside the U.S., children under 18 don’t need to get their own Global Entry, as long as they’re with a parent or legal guardian.

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