PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Democratic Gov. Gina Raimondo continues to raise substantially more money than those challenging her in the coming gubernatorial election.

Raimondo raised more than $1.2 million this spring and spent $1.6 million, starting in July with $3.9 million in the bank, according to campaign finance reports filed Tuesday with the state Board of Elections.

Democratic challenger and former Secretary of State Matt Brown raised about $77,000 and loaned his campaign $60,000. His ending cash balance was $41,000 after spending nearly $102,000 in the quarter.

The reports show Cranston Mayor Allan Fung raised the most for the Republican primary, with about $245,000 in donations. He began July with nearly $438,000 in the bank after spending about $116,000.

Republican Patricia Morgan, the House minority leader, raised more than $18,000, loaned her campaign $40,000 and spent $105,000, finishing with nearly $139,000 on hand. Republican businessman Giovanni Feroce raised $14,000, loaned his campaign $6,000 and spent more than $20,000. His ending cash balance was just $82.

Former Republican state Rep. Joseph Trillo, who's running as an independent, raised about $2,000 and spent nearly $39,000, finishing with $86,000. Trillo has said that he'll pay for most of his own campaign expenses.

During the first three months of the year, Raimondo took in $1.3 million in campaign contributions and had more than $4.3 million in her account as of March 31. WPRI-TV reported Tuesday that Raimondo has spent $1 million on television advertisements since June.

Raimondo opted out of taking public matching funds, which come with spending limits. Gubernatorial candidates who participate in the state's program will be eligible for more than $1 million.

In the race for lieutenant governor, Democratic state Rep. Aaron Regunberg raised more and outspent incumbent Democratic Lt. Gov. Dan McKee.

Regunberg raised $93,000 in the quarter and spent nearly $71,000, starting July with $371,000 in the bank. McKee raised $61,000 and spent more than $43,000, starting July with $171,000.