Hello! Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up in Oklahoma. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Oklahoma City bureau at apoklahoma@ap.org or 405-525-2121.

Oklahoma Administrative Correspondent Adam Kealoha Causey can be reached at acausey@ap.org or 405-996-1589.

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times Central.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

For up-to-the minute information on AP's coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org

.................

TOP STORIES:

TRAFFICKING LAWSUIT-OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA CITY — A second federal lawsuit accusing a pair of Oklahoma business owners of luring immigrants to the U.S. on work visas then paying substandard wages highlights what some attorneys say is a prevalent human trafficking issue in the United States that seldom calls violators to task. While there have been previous civil lawsuits over the treatment of immigrants in the United States on work visas, immigration attorney Kent Felty of Denver said they are and will continue to be rare. By Ken Miller. 760 words.

ABORTION RESTRICTION

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — A federal appeals court on Wednesday struck down an Alabama law that sought to ban the most commonly used second-trimester abortion procedure. The ruling is the latest blow to efforts in some states to ban the second-trimester abortion procedure in which the fetus is removed in pieces with forceps. Courts have blocked similar laws in Kansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Texas, and Arkansas. By Kim Chandler. 470 words.

FROM AP MEMBERS

CARLSBAD CAVERNS-THREATENED BATS

CARLSBAD, N.M. — The half a million bats that call Carlsbad Caverns National Park home could face the threat of the deadly white nose syndrome. Federal agencies have mobilized in recent weeks to combat a microscopic organism that could potentially kill off thousands of the Mexican free-tailed bats that make the national park famous, the Carlsbad Current Argus reports . White nose syndrome was found in bat populations in states across the country, with the closest discovery in Oklahoma and Texas. 460 words.

IN BRIEF:

SCHOOL STABBING-OKLAHOMA — Police say a 14-year-old Oklahoma boy accused of repeatedly stabbing a female classmate during a school assembly wanted a romantic relationship with the girl.

JAIL SMUGGLING ATTEMPT FOILED — Authorities say some inmates on the 12th floor of the Oklahoma County jail tried get drugs and other items smuggled in by knocking a hole in the wall, then lowering to the ground bedsheets that had been tied together.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA-OKLAHOMA — The latest medical marijuana rules will stay in place after a judge's decision on a court challenge against them.

OKLAHOMA EMAIL FRAUD — Federal prosecutors say victims of online email scams will recover nearly $611,000 that ended up in a bank account belonging to an Oklahoma City-based multilevel marketing company.

IN SPORTS:

OKLAHOMA-MURRAY

Kyler Murray has been picked as Oklahoma's starting quarterback. The seventh-ranked Sooners said Wednesday that Murray will start the season-opener Sept. 1 against Florida Atlantic. By Cliff Brunt. 130 words.

___

If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to apoklahoma@ap.org and follow up with a phone call to 405-525-2121.

If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867.

For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477.

The AP-Oklahoma City