AP NEWS
Related topics

BC-AP Lifestyles Digest,1st Ld-Writethru

October 8, 2014

NOT FOR PUBLICATION OR BROADCAST

Here is the AP Lifestyles Digest for the week of Oct. 6.

Note that the Special Edition Pursuits moves Tuesday and a separate advisory will be sent. Stories will be transmitted with SPE--Pursuits in the keyword slug.

To receive the AP Lifestyles digest by email, contact sacoca@ap.org.

For copy reruns, call Customer Support, customersupport@ap.org, 877-836-9477. For photo reruns, visit the photo archive http://apimages.ap.org/.

For questions on homes, gardening, crafts and Special Editions, contact Julie Rubin, jrubin@ap.org. Food, J.M. Hirsch, jhirsch@ap.org. Travel, Beth Harpaz, bharpaz@ap.org. Fashion and general lifestyles, Shelley Acoca, sacoca@ap.org.

UPDATES: ADDS NINA RICCI; FASHION-HIJABI HIPSTERS; FOOD-Q&A-THUG KITCHEN; PETS-TREIBBALL

FASHION

FASHION-Q&A-BETTY HALBREICH

NEW YORK — Clothes and how to wear them have been a constant in Betty Halbreich’s life for most of her 86 years. Good thing she landed a job as a personal shopper at Bergdorf Goodman nearly four decades ago. Still working, Halbreich has written a memoir. Sometimes raucously funny, other times heartbreaking, she lays it all out in “I’ll Drink to That: A Life in Style with a Twist.” By Leanne Italie. SENT: 800 words, photos.

FRANCE-FASHION-GALLIANO

PARIS — John Galliano will be designing fashion again, joining Paris house Martin Margiela, three years after leaving the business in disgrace. SENT: 250 words, photos.

FRANCE-NINA RICCI

Parisian fashion house Nina Ricci has announced designer Guillaume Henry as its new creative director, following the departure of Peter Copping last month. SENT: 150 words, photo.

FASHION-HIJABI HIPSTERS

Fashion-conscious Muslim women from Kuala Lampur to Los Angeles who wear the Islamic headscarf, or hijab, have had to get creative. They say there is a gap in the market for young women looking for stylish modest wear. So through trial-and-error, slick layering of chunky jewelry and creating their own labels, hijabi hipsters have taken their unique styles online, sharing tips and trends and gaining a massive global following on social media. By fusing both their sense of fashion and their faith, Muslim women are reinterpreting traditional notions of what it means to dress conservatively. Some have also pioneered businesses around this growing demand, finding unexpected supporters among some mainstream brands, conservative Christian and Orthodox Jewish women. By AYA BATRAWY. UPCOMING: 850 words by 5 p.m. Wednesday, with photos.

PARENTING & FAMILIES

LOSING DAD

CHICAGO — On a family outing to Lake Michigan in 2012, her father was swept under while helping two children get to safety. And Genevieve Liu witnessed his drowning. Just 13 then, it seemed inconceivable that she could get through the grief. Yet, somehow she is doing that, and using her own experience to help others with her website, SLAP’D — Surviving Life After a Parent Dies. By National Writer Martha Irvine. SENT: 1,550 words Monday. Abridged version available. Photos, video.

ROCK FEST PARENT

I recently had an epiphany that a good father would take his 12-year-old daughter to a super-cool summer rock festival like Coachella or Bonnaroo. First, however, we did a practice run, at a smaller punk-rock extravaganza just a bike ride away from home. Herewith some tips I picked up for parents thinking of sharing a concert experience with their kids. For one, don’t forget the experience is about your kid’s musical enjoyment, not yours. For another, build an escape hatch. By Steve Knopper. UPCOMING: 960 words by 3 p.m. Tuesday, photos. (also running in the Special Edition-PURSUITS)

STAMP COLLECTING

Stamp collecting isn’t the flashiest of hobbies. It isn’t trendy. It doesn’t speed past you at the breakneck pace of a video game or offer the manic energy of a Cartoon Network TV series. It rewards patience and persistence, teaching those who embrace it about everything from ancient history to graphic design. And that’s exactly why a growing community of parents and teachers believe it’s a hobby worth encouraging kids to pursue. Five reasons why this retro hobby is actually perfect for today’s kids. By Melissa Rayworth. UPCOMING: 800 words by 3 p.m. Tuesday, photos. (also running in Special Edition-PURSUITS)

MOM IN THE MUSEUM

BENTONVILLE, Ark. — A new contemporary art exhibit at the Crystal Bridges museum features a somewhat surprising installation: a real mom sitting in a room, offering homey advice and smiles. The “Mom Booth” is an actual work of art, complete with shelving stocked with mom-like comforts — Band-Aids, pudding and the like — but it’s also staffed by local volunteers who are real moms. By Beth J. Harpaz. UPCOMING: 650 words by 2 p.m. Wednesday, photos. (Also running in travel)

FOOD

FOOD-HEALTHY-ORANGE ZEST PUDDING

When it comes to sweets, I have a surprising trick up my sleeve. And the best part about it? It probably won’t cost you a penny because most likely you already have it, but throw it in the trash. I’m talking about orange zest, the thin outer skin of an orange. I don’t mean the white part, called the pith. That’s bitter. The zest is just the paper-thin layer of colored skin, which contains tons of fragrant and flavorful oils. Those oils are perfect for tricking us into thinking something is sweeter than it really is. By Melissa d’Arabian. UPCOMING: 370 words and a recipe for orange zest pudding with shaved dark chocolate by 11 a.m. Monday, photos.

FOOD-HALLOWEEN TREATS

It’s true... Despite what the kids think, not all Halloween treats need to rot your teeth on contact. Which isn’t to say the goodies we’ve gathered here — a muddy punch and a granola-like snack — don’t have a sweet side. Rather, we decided to take a more balanced approach to our sugar rush. You know, just in case somebody over the age of 12 wanted some. By Alison Ladman. UPCOMING: 160 words and recipes for liquid mud punch and spicy-sweet mole pumpkin seed clusters by 11 a.m. Monday, photos.

FOOD-9 THINGS-GIN

Much as we might like otherwise, few of us have the cash, time or energy to maintain a full bar. And that can be a bummer, particularly as we move through the holidays and are constantly tempted to pour ourselves (sometimes even our guests) something creative and delicious to help make the season merry. So this year we’re taking a fresh approach to the holiday cocktail situation. We’re going to limit ourselves to one liquor and build an entire bar’s worth of cocktails around that. By Alison Ladman. UPCOMING: 170 words and nine cocktail ideas using gin by 11 a.m. Tuesday, photos.

GO FOR THE FOOD-OKLAHOMA CITY

OKLAHOMA CITY — I came from the land of kale and quinoa to the land of meat and potatoes. And just how did a New Yorker fare at the legendary Oklahoma City steakhouse called Cattlemen’s? Well, I had to ask them to hold the bacon on my filet mignon, but I learned to love lamb fries. (Hint: They’re not exactly fried lamb.) By Beth J. Harpaz. UPCOMING: 600 words by 2 p.m. Tuesday, photos. (Also running in AP Travel)

FOOD-OLD TOM GIN

There’s a new spirit in liquor, and it’s quite old. Bourbon’s having its moment with Pappy Van Winkle and now gin distillers are in a reflective mood with a few reviving Old Tom Gin, the slightly sweeter predecessor to London dry. By Michelle Locke. UPCOMING: 500 words by 11 a.m. Wednesday, photos.

FOOD-AMERICAN TABLE-RICE KRISPIE TREATS

To be honest, I had no idea about Rice Krispies Treats. That is, I certainly knew of them, but I’d never made them. And I never knew just how delicious they could be. The first time I made them, I used the original recipe. It was good, but I felt it needed a little more... something. So I made a batch of my favorite caramel sauce and decided to see what would happen if I dumped some of that in along with the usual butter and marshmallows. It made all the difference. By Elizabeth Karmel. UPCOMING: 220 words and a recipe for Rice Krispies Treats with bourbon caramel glaze by 11 a.m. Wednesday, photos.

FOOD-KITCHENWISE-RISOTTO

If you’ve never made risotto before, you’re missing out on a great candidate for a weeknight meal. With no more at hand than the right rice, an onion, some broth and a wedge of Parmesan, you have dinner. Like omelets or tortillas, risotto is attractive as a weeknight dinner because of its flexibility; you can augment it with anything, your choice of veggies and/or proteins, leftovers definitely included. And, yes, I know that the Italians think of risotto as a first course, like soup or pasta. But in this country there aren’t many working folks preparing multi-course meals during the week. By Sara Moulton. UPCOMING: 570 words and a recipe for pumpkin risotto with fried sage by 11 a.m. Thursday, photos.

FOOD-DEADLINE-CHOCOLATE HUMMUS

Admittedly, it sounds like a Halloween trick. Chocolate hummus. It’s either disgusting or just a cruel joke, right? Neither, actually. But when I first saw it sold alongside “real” hummus at the grocer, I decided it had to be one of those. There was no way a traditional hummus base — with all sorts of savory things like chickpeas — could possibly play nice with chocolate. I was pleasantly mistaken. By AP Food Editor J.M. Hirsch. UPCOMING: 300 words and a recipe for chocolate hummus by 11 a.m. Friday, photos.

FOOD-Q&A-THUG KITCHEN

NEW YORK — Writers Michelle Davis and Matt Holloway have a no-nonsense approach to food. Their website is extremely popular, and they have a new cookbook: “Thug Kitchen: Eat Like You Give a (Expletive).” By Alicia Rancilio. UPCOMING: 450 words by 2 p.m., photos, video.

HOMES & GARDENING

GARDENING-SAVING CONTAINER PLANTS

In simpler times, container gardening meant small-scale landscaping using flowering annuals. Enjoy their color for one season and go with something new the next. But shifts toward food production and mixed container planting — perennials with annuals — have changed all that, creating the need for over-wintering. By Dean Fosdick. UPCOMING: 500 words by 3 p.m. Tuesday, photos.

HOMES-DESIGNER-AUTUMN EXTERIORS

Wherever you live in the U.S., a light touch and some strategic choices can make the outside of your home more attractive for the fall season. Three designers offer tips for decorating with fall colors and textures. By Melissa Rayworth. UPCOMING: 750 words by 3 p.m. Wednesday, photos.

HOMES-RIGHT-POE HALLOWEEN

Edgar Allan Poe and Halloween are enmeshed like cobwebs on a lamppost. The master of horror fiction gave us imagery — including sinister masquerade balls, catacombs, ravens — that have long inspired Halloween aficionados and lovers of all things spooky. Some ways to incorporate the feel into holiday decorations. By Kim Cook. UPCOMING: 550 words by 3 p.m. Wednesday, photos.

PETS

PETS-CROWDFUNDING

LOS ANGELES — A kitten now called Roger was thrown from a moving car in Colorado in early September, hitting the pavement so hard his right leg shattered and had to be amputated. Animal control got Roger, who weighed just over a pound, to the shelter for help. Then 20 people came to his rescue, donating between $5 and $375 to help pay for medical bills and rehab. They did it through LoveAnimals.org, a year-old crowdfunding site, one of the first to be exclusively devoted to animals. By SUE MANNING. UPCOMING: 650 words by Wednesday, 5 a.m. ET., photos.

PETS-TREIBBALL

YOUNGSVILLE, S.C. — With shouts of “POINT” and “DRIVE” from her handler, the 3-year-old German shepherd charges into the triangle of brightly colored rubber orbs, scattering them with her nose like a cue breaking balls on a pool table. Then, zigging and zagging, Riley nudges the big purple one expertly down the field and into the goal. This is Treibball — German for “drive ball,” or more loosely translated, “ball herding.” The sport originated in that country about a decade ago. It migrated to the United States four years ago and has been rolling along ever since. By ALLEN BREED. UPCOMING: 650 words by 2 p.m. Friday, photos.

TRAVEL

ESCAPE THE ROOM

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — I like to think of myself as relatively quick-witted, but I started to have serious doubts about my cleverness as I stood handcuffed to my new Russian friend, trying get out of a prison cell. It wasn’t a real prison cell, which is why I wasn’t having a panic attack. But the handcuffs were certainly real, and being chained to another person while searching a small room for keys and clues as the clock is ticking down becomes frustrating pretty quickly. Believe it or not, this was all part of a game. Real-life room escape attractions began opening nearly a decade ago in Asia and Eastern Europe, but they’ve been popping up in North American major cities over the past few years. By David Fischer. SENT 800 words by noon Monday, photos.

EBOLA-TRAVEL BAN

Top government health officials say they are opposed to placing a ban on travelers from Ebola-infected countries, warning that shutting down borders could impede efforts by aid workers to stop the spread of the deadly virus. By Mark Scolforo. SENT: 600 words Monday, relayed from news lines.

RAINBOW ROOM

NEW YORK — The Rainbow Room has reopened in its historic perch atop 30 Rockefeller Plaza after a five-year absence from the New York City skyline. By Larry Neumeister. SENT: 500 words Monday, photos.

GO FOR THE FOOD-OKLAHOMA CITY

OKLAHOMA CITY — I came from the land of kale and quinoa to the land of meat and potatoes. And just how did a New Yorker fare at the legendary Oklahoma City steakhouse called Cattlemen’s? Well, I had to ask them to hold the bacon on my filet mignon, but I learned to love lamb fries. (Hint: They’re not exactly fried lamb.) By Beth J. Harpaz. UPCOMING: 600 words by 2 p.m. Tuesday, photos. (Also running in AP Travel)

HIGH TECH SPACE NEEDLE

SEATTLE — Visitors to Seattle’s Space Needle are treated to a gorgeous view of this waterfront city when skies are clear. But on a recent beautiful day, many visitors on the observation deck weren’t looking at the real view. Instead, they were mesmerized by videos offering virtual reality experiences for Seattle’s other attractions. By Donna Gordon Blankinship. UPCOMING: 600 words by 2 p.m. Tuesday, photos.

MOM IN THE MUSEUM

BENTONVILLE, Ark. — A new contemporary art exhibit at the Crystal Bridges museum features a somewhat surprising installation: a real mom sitting in a room, offering homey advice and smiles. The “Mom Booth” is an actual work of art, complete with shelving stocked with mom-like comforts — Band-Aids, pudding and the like — but it’s also staffed by local volunteers who are real moms. By Beth J. Harpaz. UPCOMING: 650 words by 2 p.m. Wednesday, photos.

CRYSTAL BRIDGES-CONTEMPORARY ART

BENTONVILLE, Ark. — The museum built with Wal-Mart money has been mocked for everything from the prices it paid for paintings to its location in northwest Arkansas. But the museum’s new exhibit on contemporary art — more than 200 works including multimedia and interactive exhibits and in-your-face explorations of social issues — could change perceptions. By Beth J. Harpaz. UPCOMING: 700 words by 2 p.m. Wednesday, photos.

5 FREE THINGS-TULSA

TULSA, Oklahoma — Oil money boomed this town into a fancy city full of tall buildings a century ago, but Tulsa’s not living in the past anymore. There’s a hipster vibe in the Brady Arts District and chatter over artisanal cocktails at local bars is more likely to concern high-tech and social media than oil. Attractions include two of the region’s finest museums, the Philbrook and the Gilcrease, but there’s also plenty to do here for free, from driving Route 66 to visiting an Art Deco church. By Beth J. Harpaz. UPCOMING: 700 words by 2 p.m. Thursday, photos.

SPECIAL EDITION-PURSUITS

PURSUITS- ROCK FEST PARENT

I recently had an epiphany that a good father would take his 12-year-old daughter to a super-cool summer rock festival like Coachella or Bonnaroo. First, however, we did a practice run, at a smaller punk-rock extravaganza just a bike ride away from home. Herewith some tips I picked up for parents thinking of sharing a concert experience with their kids. For one, don’t forget the experience is about your kid’s musical enjoyment, not yours. For another, build an escape hatch. By Steve Knopper. UPCOMING: 960 words by 3 p.m. Tuesday, photos.

PURSUITS-STAMP COLLECTING

Stamp collecting isn’t the flashiest of hobbies. It isn’t trendy. It doesn’t speed past you at the breakneck pace of a video game or offer the manic energy of a Cartoon Network TV series. It rewards patience and persistence, teaching those who embrace it about everything from ancient history to graphic design. And that’s exactly why a growing community of parents and teachers believe it’s a hobby worth encouraging kids to pursue. Five reasons why this retro hobby is actually perfect for today’s kids. By Melissa Rayworth. UPCOMING: 800 words by 3 p.m. Tuesday, photos.

PURSUITS-TAIKO DRUMMING

When I started studying taiko, I felt a little unprepared musically and — surprisingly — physically. “Taiko is full-body drumming,” says performer and teacher Mark H. Rooney. Taiko, a style of ensemble drumming that takes its name from the Japanese word for “drum,” isn’t one of those elegant, restrained Japanese traditional arts. It’s full of powerful, visually striking movement, and it’s loud. And taiko groups are catching on across North America. By Linda Lombardi. UPCOMING: 800 words by 3 p.m. Tuesday, photos.

PURSUITS-TEA CEREMONY

Even in today’s fast-paced, high-tech world, the 17th century Japanese tradition of tea ceremony is as popular as ever, with tea ceremony schools, classes, demonstrations and tatami-floored tea houses quietly thriving in capital cities around the world. By Katherine Roth. UPCOMING: 750 words by 3 p.m. Tuesday, photos.

PURSUITS-POWERCHUTING

Picture a dune buggy with a massive parachute attached to the back of it, sort of a cross between something the Wright Brothers might have designed and that flying machine from the Mad Max movies. That’s a powerchute. Yes, it’s a little odd-looking. And, yes, it provides a flying experience unlike any other. By John Marshall. UPCOMING: 740 words by 3 p.m. Tuesday, photos.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT (stories from week of Sept. 29)

PARENTING AND FAMILIES: TEEN BIRTH CONTROL, RECESSION-FERTILITY, THE BOND OF VIOLENCE, SAME-SEX DIVORCE

FOOD: HEALTHY PUMPKIN SOUP, CHICKEN PEANUT SOUP, 10 THINGS-PASTA, INA GARTEN, MICHELIN GUIDE-NYC, CHRISTOPHER KOSTOW, CHICKEN STOCK, TOMATO SOUP

GARDENING: CONCORD GRAPES

HOMES: STAYING OUTSIDE

CRAFTS: MINI MUMMIES

PETS: ANIMAL CRUELTY

TRAVEL: BUFFALO ROUNDUP, CUBA TOURISM, ISRAEL-TOURISM TROUBLE, COUNTRY MUSIC MUSEUM, GO FOR THE FOOD-GRAPE STOMP, SOUTHWEST GHOST TOWNS, HALLOWEEN HAPPENINGS, 5-FREE THINGS-HOT SPRINGS

FUTURE LIFESTYLES COVERAGE (through end of 2014)

HALLOWEEN: First week of October through mid-month

THANSKGIVING: Food, weeks of Oct. 20-Nov. 3.

HOLIDAYS AND WINTER TRAVEL:

—Special Edition-Holidays, 5 stories with photos, Nov. 11

—Holiday cookies, week of Nov. 10

—Holiday gifts, Hanukkah food and skiing/winter travel coverage begins week of Nov. 17 (some themes continue into December)

—Holiday entertaining, weeks of Nov. 24-Dec. 1

—Continued holiday coverage, weeks of Dec. 1-8

—New Year’s Eve, year-enders week of Dec. 15

—Year Ahead stories week of Dec. 22.

SPECIAL EDITIONS 2014

Nov. 11 - Holidays

Dec. 2 - Weddings

The AP

AP RADIO
Update hourly