MOSCOW (AP) _ The Communist Party will draw up a slate of its candidates next week for the first multicandidate national election, and activist Andrei Sakharov received more support for his candidacy, Soviet news reports said Thursday.

Under President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's reform approved last year by the Supreme Soviet, or parliament, the election March 26 will choose the 2,250 members of the new Congress of People's Deputies.

The ruling 13-member party Politburo on Thursday said the policy-making Central Committee of about 300 members will meet Tuesday to list the party nominations, according to the nightly TV news program ''Vremya'' and the official Tass news agency.

The Politburo said it received recommendations for candidates from individual party members and local party organizations as well as the Communist parties of the 15 Soviet republics. The campaign began Dec. 26.

A third of the Congress members will be elected from geographical districts formed on the basis of equal population. Another third will be chosen from districts based on their ethnic group. The final third will be chosen from the Communist Party, Young Communist League, trade unions, and other social and professional organizations.

Under the law the Communist Party is entitled to 100 deputies.

The Communist Party still is enshrined in the Soviet Constitution as the guiding force of Soviet society, and the law specifically prohibits candidates from advocating any unconstitutional action.

The Congress, in turn, will choose the president and a smaller, more active Supreme Soviet.

Tass also reported that Sakharov, dean of the Soviet dissident movement and the 1975 Nobel Peace Prize winner, was nominated for the Congress of People's Deputies by Leningrad's Ivan Pavlov Institute of Physiology.

It was at least the second institute under the Soviet Academy of Sciences to put Sakharov's name forward as a candidate.

Officials said last week that Sakharov also had been nominated by the academy's Institute of the World Economy. Both nominations will be forwarded to the academy at large for consideration.

The country's scientific workers, under the new law, can elect 75 members of the Congress.