CRABB, Texas (AP) _ The former mayor of Crabb no longer has to worry about incorporation referendums or road repairs. His first priority now is just to finish high school.

''I'm taking one day at a time,'' said Brian Zimmerman, 16. ''I haven't made my mind up about whether to go to college or what to study. I've been having too much fun living.''

Zimmerman was elected mayor at age 11 in this uncorporated town southwest of Houston, serving two terms after defeating two adults in the race. His parents said he got the idea after he couldn't find Crabb on a map.

''My main idea was that incorporation was an advantageous move and the people here needed someone to lead the fight to keep cities from annexing Crabb,'' Zimmerman said.

The young mayor put money from his savings account into the fight to get an incorporation referendum on the ballot. He did get it on the ballot, but the final vote went against incorporating.

''The mayor's office ended with that vote,'' he said.

For now, Brian's primary goal is ''to do as good as I can in high school.'' He's also enjoying his political retirement with extra time for hunting, fishing, bowling and dating.

But he's still no ordinary 16-year-old.

He's expanded what began as a summer business cooking barbecue on a pit in the parking lot of his grandmother's grocery store. ''Brian Burgers'' now operates out of a bright red trailer complete with a grill and sink, framed business licenses and health department permits.

---

CHAGRIN FALLS, Ohio (AP) - There's a gnawing problem in Chagrin Falls. A family of beavers has moved into the fashionable Cleveland suburb, much to the chagrin of residents.

''This is the worst year we've had with them,'' said Robert McKay, village administrator. ''They've done a number on a lot of trees.''

The beavers apparently have multiplied in recent years and have moved downstream in the Chagrin River to popular Riverside Park.

Small trees at the back of the park were the first to go about three months ago, McKay said. Then, the beavers started moving farther into the park, biting chunks out of ornamental cherry and other trees.

''They started chewing all the trees in the park,'' said Mayor B. Richard Bodwell, estimating the cost of the damaged trees at $3,000 or more.

Several residents are concerned about more than the trees, fearing that children or pets in the park could be injured, officials said. But they say that the animals are natuarally timid, and will flee when approached.

''At night when people walk through the park, they find themselves face to face with Bucky Beaver,'' Bodwell said.

A trapper has been helping village employees catch beavers and take them to lakes and rivers out in the country.