LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) _ The presentation of the Wanamaker Trophy to the PGA Championship winner Mark Brooks had to be moved under a tent because it started to rain just as Brooks and Kenny Perry started to play their one-hole playoff.

PGA chief executive officer Jim Awtrey apologized to the thousands of fans ringing the 18th green for not allowing them to see the ceremony.

``But you'll get to see it here in the year 2000,'' he said, eliciting a cheer from the crowd that had just been disappointed by native Kentuckian Perry's loss.

Awtrey later said the quality of the golf course and the enthusiasm of the enormous galleries at Valhalla all during the week led PGA of America officials to decide Sunday night to bring the tournament back to Kentucky at the next open date.

Next year's tournament is slated for Winged Foot Country Club in Mamaroneck, N.Y., and the 1998 tournament will move to Sahalee Country Club near Seattle. The 1999 tournament will be at Medinah Country Club outside Chicago.

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ALL IN THE FAMILY: Mark Brooks' children are supposed to start school today in Texas.

``I bet they don't make it,'' said their mother, Cynthia Brooks, after her husband beat Kenny Perry in a playoff to win the PGA Championship.

Brooks' family charged onto the 18th green after Brooks sank the winning putt.

Cynthia and her daughters, Lyndsay, 10, and Hallie, 6, had been standing next to the Perry family watching the golfers play the last hole again.

The one-hole playoff was nerve-wracking for both families.

``It's nail-biting time,'' said Sandy Perry as her husband prepared to take his second shot.

While the players try to control their emotions so their play isn't affected, players' families don't always hide their feelings.

``I've cried a couple of times already,'' Perry said after her husband finished his regulation round. Perry said she was moved by the support in the galleries for her husband. ``Everybody is pulling for him, it's incredible, totally amazing.''

Lisa Elkington was also near tears as her husband, Steve Elkington, came off the 18th green. Elkington, the defending champion, had been in contention, but missed the playoff by one stroke.

Lisa Elkington, holding her toddler daughter Annie, watched officials take the Wanamaker Trophy toward the 18th green.

``Look, Annie, you sat in that last year,'' she said.

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NO MASTER: Masters champion Nick Faldo sighed when a reporter asked him a question about what was wrong with his game at the PGA Championship this week.

``I've got a lot of work to do. It was a little bit of everything,'' said Faldo, who shot a final-round 73 to finish the tournament at 3-over.

Faldo conceded that Valhalla had something to do with his poor score.

``It beat me,'' Faldo said. ``It's played tough all week. The golf course has done all right.''

Faldo said he hasn't been satisfied with his play in the four majors this year. After winning the Masters, he finished tied for 16th at the U.S. Open and tied for fourth at the British.

``(The year) started off great, but the other ones have been disappointing,'' Faldo said. ``I didn't play well at the U.S. Open, I let some chances go at the British Open and I didn't play well here. But Augusta was pretty good. I'm not going to dump on that.''

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CHIP SHOTS: Former Kentucky basketball coach Joe B. Hall followed Russ Cochran during his round Sunday. Cochran graduated from Kentucky and is a Wildcat basketball fan. ... The PGA Championship went to a playoff for the third time in four years. Last year, Steve Elkington beat Colin Montgomerie on the first hole of sudden death to win. In 1993, Paul Azinger needed two holes to beat Greg Norman.