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Man sentenced for illegal ammo possession

November 11, 2018
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Mike Stuart, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of West Virginia, speaks during a news conference.

HUNTINGTON — A federal operation to stamp out crime in Huntington has put another target behind bars after a Huntington man was sentenced Wednesday for illegally possessing ammunition.

U.S. District Judge Robert C. Chambers sentenced Landrius Tyree “Krack Korn” Boose, 34, to three years and four months in federal prison for being a felon in possession of ammunition.

Boose pleaded guilty in June to possessing 23 .45 caliber cartridges of ammunition during a March 22 arrest. Boose was not allowed to possess the ammunition due to a 2009 conviction in Cabell County for delivery of a controlled substance.

According to criminal complaints filed in Cabell County Magistrate Court, the investigation against Boose started when a woman said he threw her out of a moving vehicle and struck her on the head with a blunt object about 3 a.m. March 22 at the intersection of 25th Street and Davis Street in Huntington.

The vehicle was spotted the same day by Huntington police officers and when a vehicle pursuit started, it was quickly called off due to the reckless nature of the chase. Boose allegedly later stopped his vehicle in the 1600 block of Artisan Avenue and fled on foot, but was apprehended shortly after.

As part of Boose’s plea, he admitted to possessing the ammo in his backpack he carried when he fled.

A .45 caliber pistol, the vehicle keys and a plastic bag containing 7.1 grams of individual bags of crack cocaine, cocaine and heroin also were allegedly found by a K-9 officer following the trail Boose took when he fled. He also had digital scales and cash.

He had been charged in state court with felony malicious or unlawful assault, fleeing in a vehicle with reckless disregard, delivery of a controlled substance and being a felon in possession of a firearm.

The case was later moved to federal court as part of “Project Huntington,” an effort launched by U.S. Attorney Mike Stuart to increase the prosecution of drug offenders and other criminals at the federal level.

On April 22, Boose was arrested on federal warrants during a Project Huntington raid known as “Operation Saigon Sunset,” when 200 federal, state and local law enforcement officers raided more than a dozen locations in Huntington.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephanie S. Taylor handled Boose’s prosecution.

Operation Saigon Sunset saw law enforcement from multiple agencies target more than 90 individuals suspected in a years-long drug ring in West Virginia and Michigan.

Although the April raid was meant to be a quiet operation, many Huntington residents were awakened that morning to the sounds of helicopters and airplanes hovering above the city.

Travis Crum is a reporter for The Herald-Dispatch. He may be reached by phone at 304-526-2801.

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