And the coaching hits just keep on coming ...

Dan Henning resigned at Boston College, Johnny Majors did the same at Pittsburgh, and Maryland's Mark Duffner and SMU's Tom Rossley were fired Monday in the latest round of coaching dismissals.

With two weeks left in the regular season, 19 of 111 Division I-A coaches have either resigned, retired or been fired.

Later Monday, Oregon State was expected to dismiss Jerry Pettibone.

Some schools have already lined up replacements.

On Tuesday, Indiana will hire Cam Cameron, an assistant with the Washington Redskins, to replace Bill Mallory, who was fired Oct. 31.

Notre Dame defensive coordinator Bob Davie was hired to replace Lou Holtz, while Joe Tiller resigned at Wyoming last week to replace Jim Colletto at Purdue.

And in I-AA, Glenn McNeely was fired at Idaho State.

Got it so far? There's more.

Since the NCAA went to I-A and I-AA schools in 1978, the record for most coaching changes in a season is 27 in 1980, when there were 139 schools in I-A.

At Chestnut Hill, Mass., Henning resigned two days after another losing season, this one rocked by a gambling scandal.

``This has been a difficult year,'' said Henning, 16-19-1 in his three seasons at BC. ``There have been a number of distractions that have hurt the focus and clouded the overall issue.''

On Nov. 6, 13 players were suspended for gambling. Two bet against Boston College in the Syracuse game, and Henning said they would never return to the team. The Eagles finished 5-7.

At Pittsburgh, the 61-year-old Majors leaves after Saturday's game against Rutgers. In his second stint with the Panthers, Majors is 11-32 in four seasons.

Majors will take a new job at Pitt as special assistant to the chancellor and athletic director.

``The final whistle Saturday will be my final whistle as the football coach at the University of Pittsburgh,'' said Majors, 184-137-10 in 28 seasons at Iowa State, Pitt and Tennessee.

At College Park, Md., the 43-year-old Duffner finished his five years at Maryland with a 20-35 record, including 5-6 this season. Duffner, however, could be a candidate to replace Yale's Carm Cozza, who retired after 32 years of coaching the Elis.

At Dallas, Rossley, hired to revive a program ruined by the NCAA's death penalty, was dismissed after his sixth straight losing season. The Mustangs were 5-6 in their first year in the WAC.

Also Monday, Baylor athletic director Tom Stanton said former Colorado coach Bill McCartney turned down an offer to replace Chuck Reedy, who was fired on Sunday.

``His feeling is that God's direction for his life is to be in charge of Promise Keepers,'' Stanton said. ``We're saddened by the fact he's chosen that direction, but we certainly respect his decision.''

At Bloomington, Ind., Cameron, 35, has spent three seasons as the Redskins quarterbacks coach. He played football and basketball at Indiana.

Mallory, who departs with a 69-77-3 record in 13 seasons with the Hoosiers, was one of four Big Ten coaches dismissed in the past month. Also dismissed in the Big Ten were Illinois' Lou Tepper, Minnesota's Jim Wacker and Purdue's Colletto.

Other coaches leaving are Gene Stallings (Alabama), John Bobo (Arkansas State, Jim Sweeney (Fresno State), Bill Curry (Kentucky), Jim Hess (New Mexico State), John Ralston (San Jose State), Buddy Teevens (Tulane) and Al Molde (Western Michigan).