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AP-Deep South News Digest,ADVISORY

August 6, 2018

Good evening! Here’s a look at how AP’s news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to:

The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org

The South Carolina AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau at 334-262-5947 or apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau at 504-523-3931 or nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau at 601-948-5897 or jkme@ap.org

For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Deep South Editor Jim Van Anglen can be reached at 1-800-821-3737 or jvananglen@ap.org. Administrative Correspondent Rebecca Santana can be reached at 504-523-3931 or rsantana@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

GEORGIA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

COMPOUND SEARCH-CHILDREN REMOVED

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — A raid on a New Mexico desert compound turned up 11 children wearing rags and living in filth, and also broke open a bizarre tale of guns, exorcism, and a search for a missing young boy who suffers from seizures and is nowhere to be found. The boy’s father was among five people arrested after the raid near the border with Colorado. Documents made public in a court filing Monday said the father told the boy’s mother before fleeing Georgia that he wanted to perform an exorcism on the child because he believed he was possessed by the devil. By Mary Hudetz and Kate Brumback. SENT: 760 words, photos.

With BC-US--Compound Search-Children Removed-The Latest.

IN BRIEF:

— GEORGIA SHERIFF-FIRINGS — Two employees of a Georgia sheriff’s office have been fired for online comments in which they sympathized with Hitler and touted the founder of the American Nazi Party.

— BURNING CAR RESCUE — Body camera video shows police rescuing a trapped passenger from a fiery car crash in Atlanta.

— FATAL SHOOTING-CRASH — Police in Georgia say a fatal shooting led to a car crashing into a vacant home.

— LOUISIANA ARREST-GEORGIA KILLING — A Louisiana man is accused in a killing in Georgia and a shooting in his hometown.

SPORTS:

FBN--FALCONS-MCKINLEY’S HEALTH

FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. — Takkarist McKinley, the Falcons’ first-round pick in 2017, showed his disruptive potential when he recorded six sacks as a rookie. But the defensive end has had surgeries on both shoulders the last two years and he’s being watched closely in training camp. By Charles Odum. SENT: 660 words, photo.

FBN--FALCONS-ALLEN CONTRACT

FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. — The Atlanta Falcons have agreed to a three-year contract extension with safety Ricardo Allen, who could have become an unrestricted free agent in 2019. SENT: 150 words.

SOUTH CAROLINA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

CLINTON-RILEY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Former President Bill Clinton said Monday that he picked Dick Riley to head his Education Department because of the former South Carolina governor’s belief in expanding education opportunities for everyone. “It was because I believed that the future of the country depended upon our ability to educate everyone,” Clinton told more than 600 people gathered at a reception to celebrate the official opening of Riley’s political collection at the University of South Carolina. “And I knew that he believed that ability is evenly distributed, but opportunity is not.” By Meg Kinnard. SENT: 370 words, photo.

NUCLEAR REACTORS-SOUTH CAROLINA

COLUMBIA, S.C. — A 15 percent rate cut ordered by lawmakers can start showing up on a private South Carolina utility’s bills after the company lost billions of dollars on two nuclear plants that were never finished, a federal judge ruled Monday. Judge Michelle Childs ruled that the cut, retroactive to April, can start showing up on South Carolina Electric & Gas bills starting Tuesday. By Meg Kinnard. SENT: 350 words.

IN BRIEF:

— SHELTER-SEX ACT — A South Carolina man who was given shelter from the rain is accused of propositioning the homeowner’s 13-year-old daughter.

— TREASURE HUNT — A South Carolina city will be the location of a citywide treasure hunt.

— FLOODING WORRIES — Officials in one South Carolina county say they’re keeping a close watch for flooding in an area that has seen continued rain in recent days.

— MOTEL DEATH — A Ft. Bragg soldier charged in the death of a South Carolina woman has been found dead.

— BEDBUGS FORCE MOVE — A bedbug infestation has forced emergency medical service crews to temporarily move out of a South Carolina fire station.

SPORTS:

FBN--PANTHERS-DAVIS

SPARTANBURG, S.C. — Linebacker Thomas Davis wants to play for the Panthers beyond this season — if the team will have him back. The 35-year-old Davis, who is entering his 14th season with Carolina, will be an unrestricted free after this season. Davis, the Panthers’ all-time leading tackler, will begin the season serving a four-game NFL-imposed suspension after testing positive for a banned performance-enhancing substance — a blemish on an otherwise stellar NFL career. By Steve Reed. SENT: 550 words, photo.

ALABAMA (All Times Central)

TOP STORIES:

TRAVEL-TRAVELLAB-ROCKET CITY

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — The birthplace of NASA’s rockets lies in the land of cotton, hundreds of miles from Cape Canaveral’s launch pads. From the first U.S. satellites and astronauts, to the Apollo moon shots, to the space shuttles and now NASA’s still-in-development Space Launch System, rocket history inundates Huntsville, Alabama. Huntsville’s nickname, Rocket City, is thanks largely to Wernher von Braun and his team of fellow German-born rocketeers who settled here in the 1950s. By Marcia Dunn. SENT: 1,063 words, photos, video.

ALABAMA HACKING ATTEMPT

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Tabitha Isner, the Democratic candidate in Alabama’s 2nd Congressional District, said Monday that Russian hackers appeared to have made more than a thousand attempts to break into her campaign website last month. Isner said there were 1,400 attempts to break into the website over two days in July. The attempts were discovered after the web hosting company reported a sudden surge of traffic to the campaign website around the time of the GOP runoff in the district. SENT: 350 words, photo.

COMPOUND SEARCH-CHILDREN REMOVED

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — A raid on a New Mexico desert compound turned up 11 children wearing rags and living in filth, and also broke open a bizarre tale of guns, exorcism, and a search for a missing young boy who suffers from seizures and is nowhere to be found. The boy’s father was among five people arrested after the raid near the border with Colorado. Documents made public in a court filing Monday said the father told the boy’s mother before fleeing Georgia that he wanted to perform an exorcism on the child because he believed he was possessed by the devil. The missing boy was last seen in Alabama. By Mary Hudetz and Kate Brumback. SENT: 760 words, photos.

With BC-US--Compound Search-Children Removed-The Latest.

BEACH VOLLEYBALL-BIRDS KILLED

SAND ISLAND, Ala. — Beach volleyball players on a small island off Alabama probably killed hundreds of unhatched birds, moving eggs to make room for their playing court and scaring adult birds from nests, according to Birmingham Audubon. The day after the damage was found, the conservation group put up ropes and signs to tell people about the Sand Island rookery of federally protected birds called least terns — and the education has worked, Katie Barnes, chief biologist for Birmingham Audubon’s Coastal Program, told AL.com. SENT: 450 words.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGE:

EXCHANGE-LONGEST YARD SALE

GADSDEN, Ala. — “Rust sells,” Cookie Watson and Mary Mauldin agreed as they stood surrounded by a fair amount of rust and much more. The sisters-in-law started setting up their offerings for the World’s Largest Yard Sale, and already were getting customers days before the sale’s official kickoff on Thursday. The yard sale route stretches from Addison, Michigan, to Gadsden, passing through six states and covering 690 miles. It lasted through Sunday. By Donna Thornton, The Gadsden Times.

IN BRIEF:

— CONTINENTAL MOTORS-ALABAMA — A $75 million project is underway to transform Continental Motors’ operations in south Alabama.

— OFFICER-MURDER CHARGE-ALABAMA — A judge has issued a gag order in the case of an Alabama police officer facing murder charges in the shooting of an armed and suicidal man.

SPORTS:

FBC--SLOWING DOWN

UNDATED — The result of the play is a first down and the offense rushes to the line of scrimmage and sets up, linemen in their three-point stances, receivers out wide. The quarterback directs traffic, barks out something or other, maybe claps his hands, and then ... he stops and looks to the sideline for a play to be signaled. Hurry-up offense? More like hurry-up-and-wait. The fast-paced, no-huddle offenses made fashionable by Chip Kelly, Rich Rodriguez and most of the Big 12, fueling a scoring frenzy in college football for more than a decade, are becoming less prevalent. By Ralph Russo. SENT: 1,220 words, photos.

With BC-FBC--Slowing Down-By The Numbers.

FBN--CHEETAH CHIEFS

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. — The fastest member of the Kansas City Chiefs was drafted in the fifth round a couple of years ago. Second-fastest? He went in the sixth last spring. Now, if defensive back Tremon Smith can perform anything like Tyreek Hill when he steps onto the field for the Chiefs’ preseason opener against Houston on Thursday night, general manager Brett Veach and coach Andy Reid will have hit on something special at a position of tremendous need. Hill began his career at Oklahoma State before a domestic violence incident landed him at West Alabama. By Dave Skretta. SENT: 770 words, photo.

LOUISIANA (All Times Central)

TOP STORIES:

CONFEDERATE STATUE-COURTHOUSE

CLINTON, La. — The statue of the unnamed Confederate soldier has stood since 1909 in front of the courthouse in Louisiana’s East Feliciana Parish, hands resting on his rifle looking down on the flow of lawyers, jurors and defendants going into the white columned building. Ronnie Anderson, an African-American man charged with possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, illegal possession of a stolen firearm, and speeding, was one such defendant and the statue gave him cause for concern. Anderson wants his case to be moved to another parish without such a memorial; his motion to change venue argues he can’t get a fair trial in the same place where a “symbol of oppression and racial intolerance” stands. By Rebecca Santana. SENT: 870 words, photos.

PUBLIC DEFENDERS-LAWSUIT

NEW ORLEANS — Judges hearing an appeal Monday on whether putting poor defendants on wait lists for an attorney violates their constitutional rights appeared skeptical as to whether it was the federal court’s job to step in or whether there was still a need to do so. The three-judge panel at the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was hearing a case brought by the American Civil Liberties Union. The ACLU sued the New Orleans and state public defenders in 2016 on behalf of three defendants after the New Orleans body began putting some poor defendants on wait lists to get an attorney. The Orleans Public Defenders argued they didn’t have the resources and staffing to fairly defend those clients. By Rebecca Santana. SENT: 500 words.

MEDICAID CONTRACTS

BATON ROUGE — The private companies that manage care for most of Louisiana’s Medicaid patients recently paid $250,000 in fines for inaccurate record-keeping, the state health department said Monday, on the eve of a legislative hearing digging into agency oversight of the companies. The companies had incorrect records for health providers enrolled with each managed-care plan, the health department said, including inaccuracies in online data used by Medicaid patients to search for providers, make appointments and determine if the doctor is taking new patients. By MELINDA DESLATTE. SENT: 420 words.

DEATH PENALTY-US POLITICS

MINNEAPOLIS — Pope Francis’ decree that the death penalty is “inadmissible” in all cases could pose a dilemma for Roman Catholic politicians and judges in the United States who are faced with whether to strictly follow the tenets of their faith or the rule of law. Some Catholic leaders in death penalty states have said they’ll continue to support capital punishment. But experts say Francis’ change could shift political debates, loom over Supreme Court confirmation hearings, and make it difficult for devout Catholic judges to uphold the law as written. Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry, a Catholic and a Republican, said his support for the death penalty hasn’t wavered. He criticized the Pope’s leadership, saying Francis has a “socialist bent” and his statement doesn’t change church doctrine. By Amy Forliti. SENT: 960 words, photos.

JAIL DIRECTOR-LAWSUIT PROTECTION

NEW ORLEANS — The head of the troubled New Orleans jail has asked a federal judge for protection from lawsuits. Compliance Director Darnley Hodge Sr. requested Friday that U.S. District Judge Lance Africk declare he’s acting as an officer of the court and thus cannot be sued. Africk oversees the Orleans Parish Sheriff’s Office 2013 consent decree with the federal government. SENT: 300 words.

DEER URINE LURES

BATON ROUGE — Louisiana wildlife officials are cautioning hunters that deer urine lures might carry malformed proteins that can spread a fatal brain infection called chronic wasting disease. Seven states — Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Virginia — have banned such lures, which are used to attract deer, a Department of Wildlife and Fisheries news release Friday noted. SENT: 210 words.

IN BRIEF:

— EDWARDS-TRUMP MEETING — Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards says he’s meeting with President Donald Trump this week to talk about his state’s criminal justice overhaul.

— LOUISIANA GAMBLING — Louisiana’s chief gambling regulator says three of the state’s 15 riverboat casinos have indicated interest in moving their properties onshore, under a law passed earlier this year.

— COAST GUARD-LAKE SEARCH — The Coast Guard says crews have rescued a 43-year-old man and are looking for a 32-year-old woman missing in the big brackish lake that borders New Orleans.

— MOTORCYCLIST FALLS OFF BRIDGE — New Orleans police say a motorcyclist has fallen off a bridge and died.

— LOUISIANA ARREST-GEORGIA KILLING — A Louisiana man is accused in a killing in Georgia and a shooting in his hometown.

SPORTS:

FBN--SAINTS-ESTABLISHED ONYEMATA

METAIRIE, La. — Saints defensive tackle David Onyemata is no longer an intriguing international prospect with unknown potential. The native Nigerian, who learned American-style football as a college student in Canada, enters his third pro season as a confident, established starter who is trying to grow into one of New Orleans’ top defensive players. By Brett Martel. UPCOMING: 650 words, photos by 6:30 p.m.

FBC--LSU-SEEKING BALANCE

BATON ROUGE, La. — For the first time since Jarvis Landry and Odell Beckham were teammates at LSU, there are signs the Tigers might be as inclined to throw the ball as run it. There is no proven running back in waiting this season, the Tigers have some intriguing receiving targets, and new offensive coordinator Steve Ensminger is himself a former quarterback. By Brett Martel. SENT: 730 words, photos.

BKC--LSU-HYATT

BATON ROUGE, La. — LSU men’s basketball coach Will Wade says he has completed the Tigers’ roster for the upcoming season with the addition of 6-foot-7 forward Aundre Hyatt. SENT: 170 words.

MISSISSIPPI (All Times Central)

TOP STORIES:

HISTORIC HALL

BAY ST. LOUIS, Miss. — The new owner of a historic music venue in Bay St. Louis has big plans for the location The Sun-Herald reports that Rachel Dangermond is the new owner of 100 Men Hall. The 1922 blues hall was a center of African-American social life and entertainment. Such legendary artists as Etta James, Ray Charles, Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry and James Brown performed there. SENT: 290 words.

IN BRIEF:

— WEST NILE-MISSISSIPPI — The Mississippi State Department of Health is confirming six more cases of West Nile virus, bringing the state’s 2018 total to 13 so far.

— GARBAGE CONTRACT-OPEN MEETINGS — A hearing officer says a southwest Mississippi city government violated the state’s open meetings law in reviewing potential garbage collection contracts behind closed doors.

— JACKSON ZOO — A financially imperiled zoo in Mississippi has been borrowing state capital improvement money to cover operating expenses, a maneuver the zoo’s leader acknowledges is improper.

— MISSING TEEN-CHAT APP — A northwest Mississippi teenager has resurfaced in Illinois four days after he went missing.

— CREEK DEATH — Authorities say a man who jumped off a bridge into a creek in Mississippi has died.

— TEENAGER SLAIN — Authorities say an 18-year-old was gunned down at a back-to-school event in Collins.

SPORTS:

FBC--SLOWING DOWN

UNDATED — The result of the play is a first down and the offense rushes to the line of scrimmage and sets up, linemen in their three-point stances, receivers out wide. The quarterback directs traffic, barks out something or other, maybe claps his hands, and then ... he stops and looks to the sideline for a play to be signaled. Hurry-up offense? More like hurry-up-and-wait. The fast-paced, no-huddle offenses made fashionable by Chip Kelly, Rich Rodriguez and most of the Big 12, fueling a scoring frenzy in college football for more than a decade, are becoming less prevalent. By Ralph Russo. SENT: 1,220 words, photos.

With BC-FBC--Slowing Down-By The Numbers.

___

If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to

The Atlanta AP Bureau: apatlanta@ap.org

The South Carolina AP Bureau: apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau: apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau: nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau: jkme@ap.org

If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867. For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477.

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